Uncategorized

Day 10 Batch #2 No More Bubbles

7:00 am     It looks like batch#2 went from a bubbling every 4 to 5 seconds to a dead stop overnight. I guess I’ll be racking today! My “bread yeast” mixture looks better today. I hope “better” means more likely to make a fully risen, tasty loaf of bread!

Bread "starter" from batch #1 cider yeast.

Bread “starter” from batch #1 cider yeast.

8:45 am     Racked batch #2 into two 1 gallon carboys. The SG is 0.992 @ 69 degrees, so actual SG, adjusted for hydrometer calibration at 60 degrees, is 0.993. The 2nd carboy is less full than I had hoped. Always the question, in the beginning, is too much head space at this point  detrimental? The first carboy, I filled to where the bottom of the handle rejoins the bottle, which is about 3″ from the lip. Carboy #2’s fill level is 6″ below the lip, which is just below the curve of the shoulder.

Opening day on the primary fermentation bucket, batch #2!

Opening day on the primary fermentation bucket, batch #2!

The carboys, batch #2

The carboys, batch #2

Comparing batch #1, left and #2, right.

Comparing batch #1, left and #2, right.

I have decided to name Batch #1 “Sherlock’s Cumber Batch #1 Crabapple Cyser”. I have always enjoyed Sherlock Holmes.

Sherlock's Cumber Batch #1, Crabapple Cider

Sherlock’s Cumber Batch #1, Crabapple Cider (image copywrite S-A–K-A-I)

The currently popular BBC series is very good and the lead actor’s last name is Cumberbatch.  So, “batch” is part of the name. And the definition of “cumber” is “to hinder or encumber by being in the way” or “to clutter up”. If Sherlock were to have a bit too much cyser, it could be a  cumber to his famous mental faculties! Sherlock’s Cumber…batch #1…crabapple cyser. Perfect! Born October 21st, 2013, bottling date to be determined. The image above is by the artist “S-A–K-A-I”…that’s how he writes it. Yes two dashes between the A and the K. I’m thinking this will work nicely as a label. Since I’m not going to sell it in anyway, I think I’m okay on the copyright issue. If I could, I would give him a bottle when it’s ready and I hope that he would be flattered! He did do a nice job and I am giving him credit.

More on the bread: Using a sourdough French bread recipe that I found that calls for 2 c. sourdough starter. That’s how I’m going to treat my yeast mixture here. Took 2 cups out for the bread dough.

"Cider Starter"

“Cider Starter”

Added a 1/2 cup A.P. Flour back in and a 1/2 cup of water. Stirred and transferred to a pint canning jar and popped it into the fridge. Processing the dough in my bread machine for the mixing/kneading. I’ll process it myself from there. I had read that experienced brewers advise against using yeasty sediment from beer brewing to make bread. I think the main issue is the hops matter in the sediment, which would make bread very bitter. I haven’t gotten the much from the cider crowd. The cider sediment would include live and expired yeast and crabapple. I’ve run the dough through the machine and it looks and smells good. It’s in a bowl, covered on the back of the stove currently. Let’s see if it rises!

Starter for future bread.

Starter for future bread.

Dough after kneading.

Dough after kneading.

In the bread machine.

In the bread machine.

Now for the rise and the shaping, second rise and bake. It gave a good first rise and I shaped it into two baguettes. I placed those on my bread pan, on top of a dusting of corn meal. I covered them with plastic wrap and gave it about an hour and a half or so (I wasn’t watching the clock carefully) and the second rise occurred exactly as it should. The dough has a nice yeasty aroma.

After the first rise.

After the first rise.

Shaped, 2nd rise done and ready to bake!

Shaped, 2nd rise done and ready to bake!

Popped the bread into a preheated oven at 375 degrees and spritzed the bread and oven with water. There is also a loaf pan on the bottom of the oven that has some hot water in it. That will stay in the first 15 minutes. Spritzed the dough a couple more times about two minutes apart. I’ll check the bread for doneness after 30 minutes…it could take up to 40 minutes. I’m starting to smell the bread baking, as I write this…I’ll be back! … Oh,,,MY! That looks and smells good!!! Timer goes off and I think another 5 minutes. And another 5 minutes. The internal temperature is about 180 degrees. Most recipes online suggest 190-210 degrees. (But they look great!)

Okay, out of the oven and the internal temperature is 195 degrees. The loaves are beautiful. The only thing that could make this experiment a failure, at this point, is if they just taste like crap! But the aroma is telling me I have success.

Nice looking loaves!

Nice looking loaves!

The aroma was accurate, in my opinion. It’s an unusual bread, though. It doesn’t really have a sourdough flavor. The crust came out good for a baguette style loaf. The texture is pretty and uniform…the rise was good, but with smaller bubbles, creating a more dense texture. It might be more suited to a regular loaf pan style bread.

Good crust. Dense, uniform texture. Aroma and flavor mildly matching the cider it was made from.

Good crust. Dense, uniform texture. Aroma and flavor mildly matching the cider it was made from.

The interesting part is that I get the aroma and flavor very similar to the cider. There is a yeasty/apple element, but very mild and not really sweet. Personally, I like it; however, it won’t appeal to everyone.

Advertisements
Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s