Uncategorized

Day 130 Racking the Hi-Nelson Saison & Washing Yeast

Set-up to rack to secondary.

Set-up to rack to secondary.

 

It has been 2 weeks and a few days since I brewed the Hi-Nelson Saison (July 4th). A check with the hydrometer, after temperature correction, shows 1.004 SG. I’ll get a final gravity reading at bottling, but right now, the ABV is looking like 8.40%. The hydro sample is an appropriate color, I think. The aroma is nice…not too pronounced yet, but I’m sure dry hopping will change that! The flavor is good, but a bit boozy at this point. I’m using a bottling bucket for primary fermentation and the trub is above the spigot level, so I’m going to have to use a siphon to rack to secondary. Since I’m dry hopping, I’m racking to another bottling bucket, instead of the carboy.

Hi-Nelson Saison hydrometer sample. Ready to rack to secondary.

Hi-Nelson Saison hydrometer sample. Ready to rack to secondary.

So, here we are a few hours later and I got the racking done. The beer in primary fermentation looks good and I can smell the alcohol.

Opening the primary fermentation bucket.

Opening the primary fermentation bucket.

I made the hibiscus tea in a pitcher with a plunger, designed for mixing, but it did a good job straining the flowers out of the tea.

Hibiscus tea.

Hibiscus tea.

I added the tea to the secondary, another bottling bucket and started the racking process.

Mingling the beer and the hibiscus tea via racking.

Mingling the beer and the hibiscus tea via racking.

I sanitized the packets of Nelson Sauvin hops and a pair of scissors and I had a nylon bag soaking in sanitizer.

Ready for dry hopping

Ready for dry hopping

I put the hops pellets in the bag, tied it off and tossed it in the secondary bucket. The new color is striking!

Hibiscus tea and Nelson Sauvin hops are in and ready to seal.

Hibiscus tea and Nelson Sauvin hops are in and ready to seal.

After racking, I still have well over 5 gallons of beer and a little under a gallon of trub.

I have never tried washing and harvesting yeast before, but I’m going to give it a shot and see how it works. I know that higher alcohol exposure may make this attempt not very viable, but I’m going to see what happens.

I have put the lid and airlock back on the trub and boiled a gallon of water.

Hi-Nelson Trub

Hi-Nelson Trub

 

The water is in a gallon carboy in the refrigerator to cool. I’m following a procedure for which I found an online video. It’s basically adding water, mixing, letting it settle and pouring off the yeast into a smaller container, letting that settle and pouring off into smaller containers, then refrigerating. If I’m lucky, enough viable yeast will survive to make a starter and a test batch of beer. The yeast is Belle Saison.

Chilled the gallon of water down…finishing in an ice bath in the sink.

Chilling boiled water for washing yeast.

Chilling boiled water for washing yeast.

I got it down to about 85F. Belle Saison is good up into the 90’s, so it should be good. Sealed bucket and swished around well. After about 45 minutes (I got distracted), I poured off a little over 1/2 gallon into the 1 gallon carboy. It immediately started separating.

Boiled water added and separation done in fermentation bucket. Poured into 1 gallon carboy.

Boiled water added and separation done in fermentation bucket. Poured into 1 gallon carboy.

After settling, I decanted to four 1-pint size jars and transferred those to the refrigerator.

Four pints of (hopefully) harvested Belle Saison yeast.

Four pints of (hopefully) harvested Belle Saison yeast.

We’ll see how that settles out over the next couple of days. I found a fairly simple looking Citra Saison that I may try some of the harvested yeast on…pinned the recipe to Pinterest. I might make it a half batch to keep the investment lower for the first test.

 

Advertisements
Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s