Uncategorized

Bottled Belgo Paleo

Bottling!

Ready for bottling!

I just finished bottling the Belgo Paleo Belgian Pale Ale and I wound up with 42-12 oz bottles. I thought I had more corn sugar on hand to prime with, but I only had 3/4 oz. So, I primed with table sugar. The recommended amount for a Belgian Ale is 1.9 to 2.4 atmospheres.With my history of overcarbonating, I looked at the lower end of the scale and the amount of sugar recommended is 2-1/2 oz; I went with a scant 2-1/8 oz. Always feels like a bit of a crapshoot, but we’ll see how THAT works out.

Bottling bucket.

Bottling bucket.

I did get a hydrometer sample again and the FG is confirmed at 1.015. My OG was almost dead-on at 1.060 (recipe says 1.059), but I just couldn’t get to the projected 1.009 FG. So, instead of 6.56%, I wound up with a respectable 5.91% ABV.

Nice color.

Nice color.

Flash makes it hard to see the line is actually 1.014...with temp correction = 1.015 FG

Flash makes it hard to see the line is actually 1.014…with temp correction = 1.015 FG

In an attempt to lessen the chances of overcarbonation, I cleaned all my containers and equipment with a solution of super washing soda from Arm&Hammer, rinsed and sanitized with Starsan. I ran the bottles through the dishwasher AND sanitized with Starsan. Keeping my fingers crossed!

Standard
Uncategorized

Brew Day Belgo Paleo

Ready to Brew!

Ready to Brew!

Brew Day! I’m actually writing this on the day after, but it was a long day. I had to help prepare for my older daughter’s baby shower and, after brewing and planting several things in the garden, I had to go help with the clean up. I was sore and tired last night!

First, I want to address the fact that I have had an ongoing problem with overcarbonation in several of my brews. Most have been darker beers…stout, porter, Scottish ale; but that may not necessarily have anything to do with it. I’ve tried backing down on priming sugar, extending the fermentation period, careful sanitizing procedures. I have been wondering if maybe the equipment I’m using or the bottles may need replacing or heavy duty cleaning, rather than rinsing and sanitizing. Before this brew, I soaked EVERYTHING in a solution of Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda…carboy, buckets, utensils, hoses, siphon, airlocks and stoppers. Before I bottle, I will soak the bottles in the same solution, run them through the dishwasher (including heated drying cycle), and sanitizing. If this batch winds up overcarbing, I will have NO clue what to try next. Keeping my fingers crossed.

The recipe I brewed is a Belgian Pale Ale called Belgo Paleo and it sounds pretty good. It uses Green Bullet hops for buttering, Tettnang at 30 minutes and Saaz at 15 minutes and dry hop. The yeast is a packet of dry Safbrew Abbaye.

Pellet hops

Pellet hops

I followed my usual brew day procedures, with one exception: I used my new stainless steel wort chiller for the first time!

New stainless steel wort chiller

New stainless steel wort chiller

I didn’t have to buy 8 bags of ice this time! I set up the chiller with hoses and kept it in a bucket of sanitizer until ready to use. I put the chiller in the kettle for the last 15 minutes of the boil, to sanitize it.

Unfortunately, I can’t seem to manage leak-proof connections and a little water sprayed into the wort. It was right after flame-out, and I’m hoping it didn’t ruin the batch. I wrapped the connection in paper towels and the dripping happened away from the kettle, instead of into it. The chiller worked like a champ and my wort was down to pitching temp in under twenty minutes.

Most difficult part of the day? Pouring the wort from the kettle (actually, a S/S stock pot) through a funnel into the glass carboy. Next time, I’ll use a siphon! Should have aerated it well, though! And it’s a good thing, because the oxygen tank I have connected to an aerating “stone” evidently had the valve knocked open somehow and the canister was empty.

Ready for fermentation to start.

Ready for fermentation to start.

So, pitched the yeast and put on the airlock. There was action late last night and I heard that the Abbaye yeast is aggressive, so I switch the airlock to a blow-off tube set-up …

After fermenting 24 hours.

After fermenting 24 hours.

Blow-off tube and wrapped to keep light out.

Blow-off tube and wrapped to keep light out.

…and wrapped the carboy with a blanket to keep out light. The wort chugged all day today and is doing well, I think. As of tonight, about 32 hours after pitching the yeast, the bubbling has slowed slightly to once every few seconds.

Update: Steinpilz Gose: my brewbuddy came by and got the balance of the gose into a keg and is going to force carbonate it. I’m going to stick a couple of bottles in the fridge and we’ll compare when ready. Looking forward to that!

 

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 68 Nothing Brewing…Feels Weird

Since I bottled my hefeweizen, and scrambled for bottles to do it, I have nothing brew-related going on. Everything is in the bottle conditioning phase. It just feels weird! I did open a few bottles tonight…um…just to check their progress. Yeah, that’s it. Anyway, I started off with my Nut Brown Ale that I received as a Christmas gift-kit. It was bottled 10 days ago and is surprisingly drinkable already. Compared to my previous English Nut Brown Ale, A.K.A. Fawlty Brown Ale, it is a bit more bitter. The color and clarity are good and the carbonation may get better, but is pretty good already. In addition to the kit, I also received some Irish moss and gypsum. I believe they did their jobs! No doubt that this beer will improve with another couple of weeks in the bottle, but my first bottle out of this batch says it’s a success.

Nice clarity and color

Nice clarity and color

Nut Brown Ale

Nut Brown Ale

The second bottle of the evening was a 22 0z bottle of the Belgian Strong Dark. I believe my last taste of this beer was described as having a fruity component and maybe caramel, but not the roasted coffee or chocolate flavors. This beer has been in the bottle for 24 days and has since mellowed a bit on the caramel and it has lost that fruit from before. I’m not an expert at the critique thing for beer and I don’t have the right words to describe this flavor. Is this what people describe as “biscuit”? I will need to get some more experienced feedback on this one, but whatever it is, it’s good…at least, I think so!

Belgian Strong Dark...interesting.

Belgian Strong Dark…interesting.

The final bottle I opened this evening is the Watson’s Cider…in honor of John Hamish Watson’s nuptials on Masterpiece Theater tonight! Side note: awesome episode. ‘Nuff said. The cider, unfortunately, is not doing so well. This is an all-crabapple (foraged) sparkling cider. This is the only beverage that I have pastuerized, so far. I also was trying to retain some sweetness by not letting it ferment quite all the way out. In the process, I did not let it clarify long enough and too much lees came along for the ride. It’s a little sour in the nose…like mild vinegar. The carbonation is a bit week. If I went back through my notes, I wouldn’t be surprised to find that the carbonation is actually going down some. There was quite a bit of sediment in the bottle and the color of the cider is a medium golden, but with a little haze. I know it sounds weird, but the best way to describe it is as if someone drop one or two drops of skim milk into the glass before adding the cider. I did have fun with the label. Since calling it a “cyser”, I have seen the error in my ways…but the labels were expensive and already printed. Plus, “Watson’s Cider” sounds like a personal question.

One of my less successful beverages, but not ready to dump it yet!

One of my less successful beverages, but not ready to dump it yet!

As for the flavor, I definitely get that slight sourness/vinegar taste with an almost dry finish. These days, some people think it’s good for you to drink vinegar, so they’d probably think this was really mild and tasty! I’ll keep pulling one out, now and then to see what’s happening. I’m not ready to dump it yet, but we’ll see what happens over time. If I get desperate for a few bottles to use for something else, these are at the top of the expendable list.

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 58 Bottling Belgian Strong Dark

Bottling day! The Belgian Strong Dark had slowed to the point that I felt it was time to bottle. I got all my equipment and supplies assembled and sanitized, including fourteen 22 oz bottles and some 12 oz bottles. I racked the beer from the bottling bucket into two primary fermentation buckets and I washed and sanitized the bottling bucket.

Ready to bottle my Belgian Strong Dark!

Ready to bottle my Belgian Strong Dark!

I prepared a solution of just over 2 oz of corn sugar with 12 oz hot water and added it to the bottling bucket. I checked the FG at an adjusted reading of 1.010. I racked the beer back into the bottling bucket and mixed it with the corn sugar solution. The OG was 1.073, so the ABV should be 8.14%. I can say that a sample I tasted seemed fairly strong.

Tasty sample!

Tasty sample!

However, unlike stout, this Belgian Strong Dark does not have the roasted/toasty flavor. It has a fruity component instead, yet I still get a nice little bitterness and malt. I think I’m going to really enjoy this beer!

I used my new bench capper and was generally impressed…I need more practice, but it went well. All in all, I got fourteen 22 oz bottles and three 12 oz bottles. Now, the agonizing wait!

To ease my anxiety, I decided to make some stout braised pork country ribs.

Dry Stout. bottled 12/09/13...getting good!

Dry Stout. bottled 12/09/13…getting good!

Conveniently, I decided the recipe should use about half of a bottle of my home brewed dry stout. It was bottled on 12/09/13, I believe. It is drinkable, but another week or two wouldn’t hurt. It made a terrific braising liquid!

Stout braising some country style pork ribs...Mmm!

Stout braising some country style pork ribs…Mmm!

Standard