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Bottle Carbonated Kombucha

On 5/3/2015, I bottled a single bottle of Kombucha as a test, to see how it would do. A couple of days ago, I put the bottle into the refrigerator. This morning, I decided to open it up and check the results. Unfortunately. the bottle fogged with condensation when I removed it from the fridge. Otherwise, you would be able to see a small amount of cloudy, globby stuff in the bottom. It never really formed a SCOBY on the surface, though. I believe I added a teaspoon of sugar at bottling…have to go back and check notes to confirm.

Bottle conditioned kombucha

Bottle conditioned kombucha

I was able to easily avoid the stuff on the bottom by careful pouring. The result is a pale drink with nice clarity and a beatiful carbonation! Not too aggressive, like a soda…more like a sparkling wine.

Nice clarity, tiny bubbles!

Nice clarity, tiny bubbles!

The flavor is light and has a nice sweetness. Not syrupy, like a soda, but not too dry. The bubbles continue to rise in the glass, like champagne, long after pouring. Now I wish I had bottled a BUNCH!!! Because it does take much longer to carb than beer. This is at about 2-1/2 months.

Effervescing kombucha makes me happy.

Effervescing kombucha makes me happy.

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Day 121 Pasteurizing Tepache and Checking Wheat RyePA

Mateo's Tepache, pasteurized.

Mateo’s Tepache, pasteurized.

Well, I had eight bottles of tepache, including one that I planned for testing. It had been two days carbing, so I opened the tester…and it was a gusher! The last batch was a bit undercarbed at one day, so…need to try the next batch at a day and a half, I guess. I stuck the tester in the fridge to drink later.

The SG looks like 1.061. I didn’t check the OG, but if it was about the same as last batch, that was 1.111. That would put the ABV at around 6.5% more or less.

I went ahead and pasteurized the other 7 bottles, but one of them started leaking bubbles, so I pulled that one out and continued with 6 bottles.

A six pack of Mateo's, ready!

A six pack of Mateo’s, ready!

I re-tightened the cap on the 7th bottle and pasteurized it separately. I have kept this one aside, as it has a little more gunk in the neck and, if the cap was loose or the bottle compromised for some reason, it could be infected and need to just be poured out. I’ll check it again later.

Did a little fishing this afternoon and came home hot and thirsty. I mixed my tester with a Fresca soda. It wasn’t my favorite blend, but it was cold and wet!

Drew off a sample of the American Wheat RyePA and did a hydrometer check. The reading was  1.011 @ 73.5F, which is 1.012 after adjustment. That’s pretty much spot on expectations. OG was 1.051, FG is 1.012 for a resulting 5.12% ABV. That’s a nice session brew. The color is pale.

Sample of the Summer Brew for evaluation.

Sample of the Summer Brew for evaluation.

The aroma of this sample is pretty light, as is the flavor. I do get an understated citrus. The bittering hops are coming through mildly, but the aroma hops do not seem to be very present. I’m thinking a dry hop addition might have been desirable.  This isn’t an IPA though, so I guess it’s okay. (May have to rethink that RyePA name and just call it a Summer Ale.) It will certainly be an easy drinking brew for the hot weather we’re getting into. This was day four in secondary and bottling should happen tomorrow, but I’m sure it will be okay any time this weekend.

Update 6/06/14:   I have a 1/2 oz of Citra hops pellets in the freezer, vacuum sealed. I’m throwing those into the Summer Ale and letting it go a few more days. I’m using a nylon mesh bag to put the pellets in to keep the trub factor down. I may buy another ounce tomorrow and throw those in…thinking about it.

Summer Ale after 5 days on citrus zests

Summer Ale after 5 days on citrus zests

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Citra pellets in sanitized nylon mesh bag.

Dry hopping...and hoping!

Dry hopping…and hoping!

Update: On 6/8/2014,  I pulled the bottle of tepache out of the fridge that was suspect when I bottled it. I opened it and there was no carb at all. I dumped the bottle and cleaned the gunk out of the neck. After using a bottle brush and golding the bottle up to a light, I could see a crack in the bottle, between the lip and the next indention below that. I couldn’t feel it on the surface, inside or out, but I assume it was the culprit. I went ahead and dropped it in the recycle bin.

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Day 115 Pasteurizing Soda, First Taste Major Nelson’s IPA

Pasteurized Ginger Bug Pineapple-Mango Soda

Pasteurized Ginger Bug Pineapple-Mango Soda

I kept an eye on my soda bottles all day. There was a build-up of the more pulpy stuff in the necks of the bottles. Around noon, I carefully lifted each bottle and inverted to distribute the contents and put them back down. No explosions…good! I checked the little tester jar and it was getting carb over night, but not until afternoon did I feel it was getting carbed enough. Around 2 pm, I put the tester jar in the fridge and planned to pasteurize around 3 p.m.

I filled my pressure canner with hot water and put it on high heat, loosely covered. Using a digital thermometer, when the water got to 190F, I removed the pot from heat and carefully added the sodas. Covered loosely again, just in case a bottle were to pop. Set the timer for ten minutes. When the timer went off, I carefully removed the bottles to a kitchen towel on the kitchen counter to rest and cool. When cooled off, I’ll transfer the bottles to the refrigerator.

The little tester bottle was chilled at this point, so I gave it a swirl to mix the pulp and drank it. It wasn’t carbed like a Sprite or Ginger Ale, but it was nice and tingly. I definitely get the mango and ginger…really like the flavor. The texture is the part that would be hard to get some people into it, because of the pulp. But overall, it’s good!

I did go ahead and put an airlock on the Wheat RyePA today and moved it to a place to let it go for awhile. The tepache is not yet showing signs of life.

Update: Chilled the ginger-mint bug pineapple-mango sodas and pulled one out to try this evening. The carbonation is good…not too much, but good. The flavor is interesting and I like it. The only odd thing is the amount of pulp…so it’s kind of like a pulpy orange juice/soda hybrid.

Pulpy, but tasty pineapple-mango soda.

Pulpy, but tasty pineapple-mango soda.

Later that evening: Opened my first bottle of Major Nelson’s IPA and wow!!! Head poured creamy and slowly backed down, but never dissipated completely. The aroma was big with hops. The taste was citrus up front that quickly turned to bitter with a resin finish. I’m very happy with how this turned out! I think I finally got the carb right! Technically, this may be my best beer. It is a tad bitter for me, personally, but I think it is exactly where it is supposed to be for the style.  Another couple of weeks in the bottle won’t hurt it, but it is surprisingly good right now!

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Halfway through, the head is hanging on nicely.

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Nice head on the pour…soft, creamy.

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Day 111 Ginger-Mint “Bug” for Soda Making

 

I was giving credit to the website where I found this recipe, but they seem to be spamming now, so no more!

Anyway, I thought this sounded interesting and I have ginger and sugar on hand, so…what the heck. It begins with what they are calling a “bug”…a starter that you use each time and reserve a 1/4 cup and keep feeding it. Like a sourdough. Then they have a recipe for a pineapple-ginger soda…sounds tasty! I also can see making a mango-ginger or pineapple-mango-ginger.

Sugar and grated ginger in jar with water...plus some chocolate mint.

Sugar and grated ginger in jar with water…plus some chocolate mint.

My little twist is adding some cleaned “chocolate” varietal fresh mint. I pinched back the plant and tossed the leaves/stems into the “bug” mixture. I’m thinking basil would be a good alternative to try in the future, too!

For the bug, I added a cup of lukewarm water to a mason jar. I added 3 tsp. grated fresh ginger, with the peel on. Then added 2 tsp. sugar and a heaping tablespoon of fresh mint. I secured the lid and shook vigorously for several seconds. Then I loosened the lid, so that it isn’t air tight. Every day, I’ll add more ginger and sugar and shake. After about 4 or 5 days, the bug should be fizzy.

Added mint, shake, shake shake! Loosen lid.

Added mint, shake, shake shake! Loosen lid.

The next step will be to draw off 1/4 cup of liquid and combine it with 48 oz of fruit juice. (The rest of the “bug” gets topped off and put back in the fridge.) I plan on extracting fresh pineapple and mango juices to make my soda. I’m also toying with the idea of coconut water. The recipe calls for the mixture to be divided into jars and tightly lidded for 1 to 3 days, until fizzy and then refrigerate. I think I’m going to try bottling it instead and, after carbed, pasteurizing it. Oh, and when I process the pineapple for the juice, I’ll save the skins and core to make another batch of tepache!

Speaking of tepache, I decided to open one of the three bottles I have left…I gave away a couple and drank a couple earlier. So, I poured the tepache to half fill a large pilsner style glass and tasted it. The carb is light, but pleasant and the flavor is very sweet, but nicely mellow with a little tang.

Part one: Tepache

Part one: Tepache

I then opened a strawberry blonde ale and topped it off. It’s not a sweet strawberry blonde, so it pairs well in making my awesome creation: Mateo’s Tepache Shandy!

Part two: add a light ale of your choice and you have a Mateo's Tepache Shandy!

Part two: add a light ale of your choice and you have a Mateo’s Tepache Shandy!

 

This is really refreshing and I can TOTALLY see drinking this poolside or on the beach…or at a beach bar. I’m also thinking it would be great as a base for a shrimp or crab boil! I probably won’t get to try it anytime soon, because of severe allergies in the family, but I can imagine it!

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Day 110 Bottling Major Nelson’s IPA

Major Nelson's IPA

Major Nelson’s IPA

Okay, so I bottled Major Nelson’s IPA today. This is my second all-grain Brew in a Bag (BIAB) beer. This was the “unnamed IPA” recipe from Atlantic Brew Supply for The National Big Brew on May 3, 2014. My name was runner up to “No Way Jose IPA”. I’m sticking with mine.

This IPA includes Falconer’s Fight, Cascade and Simcoe hops and features a Nelson Sauvin dry-hop. The yeast is Mangrove Jack West Coast. The OG was 1.058 and the FG is 1.012, so that yields an ABV of 6.04%.  Based on Northern Brewer’s online priming sugar calculator, I added a tad over 93 grams of corn sugar mixed with about 12 oz of hot, bottled water. The calculator tool called for 93.86 grams, but my scale doesn’t do decimals. Anyway, I made sure it was well dissolved and thoroughly stirred in to my estimated 3.8 gallons of beer to be bottled. I wound up with 40 12 oz bottles. That’s 3.75 gallons. And I did have about a half a bottle left over, so I pretty well nailed the volume with my estimate. I hope that translates to a perfectly carbed IPA! I am encouraged by the aroma, flavor and color. The recipe says to age 30 days. I’m looking forward to it! I’m betting this will be great on July 4th…so I put American Flag crown caps on this batch.

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Day 106 Pasteurizing Tepache

Let me just say, I’m not a huge fan of pasteurizing. I don’t like the added risk of blowing a bottle  or the possibility that it may affect the flavor of my beverage. I have heard it said that it doesn’t, but the one batch of cider that I pasteurized had a kind of soapy flavor. Might have been unrelated. My batch of Tepache, however, has a lot of residual sugar in in, so I pretty much have to pasteurize.

Bottles in the canner for pasteurization.

Bottles in the canner for pasteurization.

I used my pressure canner to pasteurize  my Tepache. I heated the water to 190F and moved it off the heat. I added the bottles and the temp only dropped about 1 degree. I set a timer for ten minutes. I put the lid on, just to be safe, in case one pops. No problems.

Covered for safety.

Covered for safety.

I’m going to let them rest on a kitchen towel until the reach room temperature. Then I can store or refrigerate. These aren’t meant for long-term storage though. It’s meant to be enjoyed fresh. I checked the water temperature when I removed the bottles and it was 170F.

I also put together a simple label for this rustic little batch…nice!

Mateo's Tepache!

Mateo’s Tepache!

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Day 89 Bottling Costa Kona Mocha Latte Stout

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At this point, I’m not going to go into all the cleaning, bottle washing, setting up stuff. I’ve gone over all that before…don’t skip it, it’s important! Sample of the final product has an FG of 1.022 and is a nice deep cola color with good clarity. I calculate the ABV to be 5.38%.

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I used 2-1/2 oz of corn sugar in 8 oz of very hot water to the bottling bucket. (Trying to adjust the carb level to the beer style…I hope this turns out well!)  I topped that with 1 quart of cold brewed Kona blend coffee concentrate and then racked the beer from secondary off of the cocoa nibs and into the bottling bucket, blending well.

Cold Brewed Coffee Concentrate and Corn Sugar in hot water.

Cold Brewed Coffee Concentrate and Corn Sugar in hot water.

I decided to do half the batch in 22 oz “bombers” and the rest in regular 12 oz bottles. Unfortunately, my bench style capper messed up on my first bottle. I haven’t tried to figure it out yet. All my beer was in the bottles and I didn’t want to take too long and risk contamination, so I used the handheld capper. It wasn’t too bad. I wound up with 1 case of 12 oz bottles plus 2 extra bottles (26) and 1 case of 22 oz bottles plus one extra bottle (lucky 13).

To celebrate, I popped open a bottle of Troegs Java Head. Dayum, this stuff is good! My Costa Kona Mocha Latte Stout will be sweeter and include chocolate with the coffee…and I think it will be very good; but let’s be honest, it’s not going to be Java Head good!

This is great stuff...what my brews dream of being!

This is great stuff…what my brews dream of being!

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