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Day 141 Bottling Cherry Belle Saison

Cherry Belle Saison

Cherry Belle Saison

I made a rookie mistake this morning. I got all set up to bottle a small batch and I started filling the bottles without having added any priming sugar. D’oh! So, I quickly cleaned and sanitized a 2 gallon fermentation bucket, consulted Northern Brewer’s priming sugar calculator and got on with the little task of priming. The calculator recommended 1.33 oz (using corn sugar) for a 1 gallon batch at 78F. I have a history of over-carbing, and this was recommended at 3.2 volumes of CO2 for a saison style, so I went with 1.25 oz. Not a big reduction…nothing to do but wait and see how it turns out.

Oops...started bottling without priming sugar! Put it in reverse!

Oops…started bottling without priming sugar! Put it in reverse!

I added the priming sugar to about 8 oz warm water to dissolve and added it to the bucket. I poured the bottles I had filled onto the sugar mixture and then racked the balance of the beer onto it and mixed it well. I rinsed and sanitized the bottles and started over with the bottling. I was able to fill 11 bottles with just enough left over for a small sip to taste.

Yielded 11 bottles.

Yielded 11 bottles.

The color imparted by the cherries is beautiful…love it! The aroma is definitely cherry and there’s a little alcohol there. As for the flavor, there’s good cherry there. At this point, however, I’m not getting any of the bittering from the Citra hops and no saison character from the yeast. I’m going to give this 2 months to bottle condition though, so I’m hoping some more complexity develops.  I’m second guessing myself now on the decision not to dry hop this little batch. Ah well, relax, it’s just home brew beer, right? At the worst, it will be a fizzy alcoholic cherry drink.

Yesterday, I racked the main batch of Citra Belle Saison to secondary with a dry hop bag containing one ounce of Citra hops pellets. I love the smell of these when you cut open the packet! Wow!

Racking to secondary.

Racking to secondary.

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Anyway, I didn’t get a chance to write it up, but everything went smoothly. I decided to take a shot at harvesting a second round of Belle Saison yeast, just to see how it does. I only saved one jar…just play with.

Washing yeast. Decanted yeast to a small jar after it settled.

Washing yeast. Decanted yeast to a small jar after it settled.

The Citra Belle Saison will get about 5 days on the hops before bottling, so may be bottling Saturday.

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Day 140 Pasteurizing Tepache, Bottling Ginger Beer, Racking Cherry Belle Saison

Pasteurizing.

Pasteurizing.

 

I decided to go ahead and pasteurize the Peach-Pineapple Tepache. The test bottle was pretty hard. The sample I tasted was lightly carbonated, but I didn’t want to take a chance of overcarbing. I filled my pressure canner body, with the false bottom, with hot water. I used the bottles to be pasteurized as a measure of how much water to use. This served an additional purpose: warmed the bottles a little before pasteurization. I removed the bottles and put the pot on the stove. I brought the water up to 180F and removed the pot from the heat, placed the bottles in, partially covered with the lid, and set a timer for ten minutes.

Lid mostly covering the bottles.

Lid mostly covering the bottles.

Bottles in, off heat, at 180F

Bottles in, off heat, at 180F

When time was up, I removed the bottles to a towel on the counter to cool.

Pasteurized bottles, cooling.

Pasteurized bottles, cooling.

My next project was to bottle the non-alcoholic ginger beer.

Strained ginger beer (non-alcoholic)

Strained ginger beer (non-alcoholic)

I strained the solids out through a cheesecloth and the used a siphon and bottle wand to fill cleaned/sanitized bottles and capped them. They will need to carb for at least 24 hours and then be pasteurized.I believe this batch is too sweet, but I followed the recipe. I put the ginger and spices back into the fermentation bucket. Since they only sat for 24 hours, I feel like there is more flavor to give. So, I’m making a “second runnings” ginger beer that I am going to allow to ferment and produce alcohol.

"Second Runnings"

“Second Runnings”

I added 4 cups of water and measured the OG at 1.062. I may reduce the sugar a little in future batches.  Anyway, I put the bucket back on the heating pad and wrapped it in the Space Blanket.

Next, I got a quart of Culligan bottled water and boiled it for ten minutes and, while it was boiling, I siphoned the the Cherry Belle Citra Saison into a 1 gallon glass carboy for a tertiary stage, leaving behind the cherries and a little sediment.

Secondary leftovers from the Cherry Belle Citra Saison

Secondary leftovers from the Cherry Belle Citra Saison

The color is really nice and the cherry flavor is good. I think this will benefit from a little aging. After the boiled water chilled in the refrigerator, I topped off the saison to a gallon. It didn’t take the whole quart…maybe a pint. I’ll let this settle for a couple of days and then bottle it.

Racked Cherry Belle Citra Saison, before top-off.

Racked Cherry Belle Citra Saison, before top-off.

As for the main batch of Belle Citra Saison, I did an SG check and it was 1.000 at 83F. That’s 1.003, corrected for temperature. This should be ready to rack to secondary any time. When I do rack it, I’ll be dry hopping with an ounce of citra pellets.

Main Belle Citra Saison hydrometer sample.

Main Belle Citra Saison hydrometer sample.

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Day 108 Racking Major Nelson IPA & White’s SEC

Dry hopped Major Nelson, ready for secondary.

Dry hopped Major Nelson, ready for secondary.

Primary has been going for 8 days, the last 4 were dry hopped with Nelson Sauvin. I racked a little over 5 gallons from the bottling bucket that I used for primary fermentation into a big glass carboy.

Racking to secondary.

Racking to secondary.

This batch had a crapload of trub! I wound up with what looks like a little under 4 gallons of beer and gallon or more of trub…dang it!

Spent yeast and hops equals a gallon of trub!

Spent yeast and hops equals a gallon of trub!

Trub up to the gallon mark...maybe a little more.

Trub up to the gallon mark…maybe a little more.

I could have topped it more after the boil, but it would have brought down my SG. I would rather have better beer, than more beer (to some extent…short a full gallon kinda hurts)!

A little under 4 gallons (?) in secondary.

A little under 4 gallons (?) in secondary.

I pulled a small sample to taste…and managed to knock it over. D’oh! I did get a single, small sip and it has a bracing bitterness and very hoppy aroma. So many hops I haven’t had experience with before…it will be interesting! I plan on a few days in secondary; maybe a week, and then bottling. Recipe calls for aging for 30 days, but IPA’s are meant to be consumed pretty fresh, before the hops fade, aren’t they. We’ll see. I’ll check it about 12-14 days after bottling and see how it’s doing. Now…I just need to get the carbonation right!

I also racked a half gallon batch of “White’s Fresh Pressed” Super Easy Cider to secondary with no issues. The SG is 1.007…a little past where I wanted to go with it, but that’s ok. Maybe I’ll back sweeten a little when I bottle.

 

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Day 103 The National Big Brew Day & Racking Tepache

 

National Big Brew group toast!

National Big Brew group toast!

The day started out early with getting to the local brewery by 9 a.m. to set up for The National Big Brew event. I did my second BIAB all-grain brew. This beer has some interesting hops: Cascade, Simcoe, Falconers Flight and dry hopping with Nelson Sauvin. There was not a name for this beer, so they had a naming contest. I think mine was the runner up, but I’m going with it anyway: Major Nelson IPA. I love the camaraderie and access to a wort chiller…easier than the ice bath! I was one of about 5 or 6 brewers set up inside the brewery. It was a nice day and  many brewed outside, but it was hot out there!

The Outsiders.

The Outsiders.

New for this brew, my brew buddy let me use her aerator gizmo to aerate at the end…much more effective than rocking and swirling. The process went smoothly…no surprises.

BIAB set up for Mashing in.

BIAB set up for Mashing in.

I started off with a little over 5 gallons of water and, after the saccharification step and mashout, I added 2 gallons for the boil. After the boil, my OG was 1.058 and I did not top off. I wound up with about 5-1/4 gallons anyway…sweet! The recipe estimate for the OG was 1.066 (but their actual was 1.046, so I’m happy with where I would up. I’m estimating that my FG will be around 1.010 with a 6.3% ABV.  Lets see how it turns out!

In line for using the wort chiller...I'm next!

In line for using the wort chiller…I’m next!

Boiling!

Boiling!

I pitched the yeast, a Mangrove Jack West Coast, at 3 p.m., when I arrived home. I did not rehydrate it first…I have been told that it doesn’t really do much other than maybe speed up the fermentation kick-off a little. As of 8 p.m., I’m not seeing any action yet, but I am confident it will happen; probably overnight.

Draining the pineapple (using my BIAB bag)

Draining the pineapple (using my BIAB bag)

After cleaning up from my beer equipment, I checked on my Tepache. The level of fermentation was looking pretty good, so I strained the pineapple skins and core out and I sanitized a one gallon carboy. I added a 12 oz bottle of room temperature Strawberry Blonde Ale to the carboy and added the tepache liquid to it.

Tepache, racked for a couple more days, with a beer.

Tepache, racked for a couple more days, with a beer.

The brewer/fermenter in me said,”Airlock that baby!” So I did. By 8 p.m., I had a nice foam on the top and it looks like a little action in the airlock. This doesn’t have to ferment way out…probably just another day or two. If I decide to bottle any (it would only be around 6 or 8 bottles for all of it), I would definitely need to pasteurize, to avoid bottle bombs There’s going to be a LOT of residual sugar. I’m really enjoying this little experiment!

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