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Racking There Gose Sea Breeze and Blueberry-Muscadine Wine

Racking the gose base onto the grapefruit zest.

Racking the gose base onto the grapefruit zest.

Fermentation seems to have slowed way down on the “There Gose Sea Breeze” beer and I’m trying to get it done for Thanksgiving, so I racked it today. Problem: my Blueberry-Muscadine Wine is in my other carboy. I need a third to make this process work. So, I went to a local home brew shop to check out my options. I decided to go with a 5 gallon Better Boy brand plastic carboy with a port on it for a tap. That will allow me to use it like a bottling bucket, rather than having to use a siphon. Maybe this will reduce the chance for infection by one more function…maybe. Seems like a good system, but the tap is a bit tricky to install and it ain’t cheap. The carboy itself was about $28. Then, the tap comes as two separate pieces that add up to about another $30. Then, I needed the special size of stopper for the top, some 1/2″ tubing and a 1/2″ diameter bottling cane. Altogether, with tax, it was about $85.

After I got everything organized, cleaned, put together, and sanitized, things went pretty smoothly. I went with the 5 gallon Better Boy because I plan to generally use it for secondary fermentations and, at that point, usually I’m down in that range. When I racked the wine, I got a nice, full 5 gallons.

Blueberry-Muscadine Wine racked for some bulk conditioning.

Blueberry-Muscadine Wine racked for some bulk conditioning.

I then squeaked out about another quart, into a half gallon glass jug. I may go ahead and bottle that in a 22 oz bomber, when I get a chance. There’s too much head space there and I don’t want it to oxidize.

Once the wine was transferred and the glass carboy it was in was cleaned and sanitized, I prepared to rack the beer into it. I set-up the siphon and hose. Next, I added the grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer to the carboy and began racking the beer onto it.

Grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer.

Grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer.

Once that was all squared away, I started making the hibiscus tea.

Unsweetened, dried hibiscus flowers.

Unsweetened, dried hibiscus flowers.

I used a quart of hot Culligan (bottled) water and 5 oz of dried hibiscus flowers to a 2 quart stainless steel sauce pan.

Steeping to a beautiful concentrate.

Steeping to a beautiful concentrate.

Since I didn’t have one a bit bigger, I went ahead and brought another quart of the water to a boil in a big stainless stock pot. After the hibiscus flowers were brought to a boil, I covered them and turned off the heat. The other water boiled for a few minutes and, after the flowers steeped for 10 minutes, I strained the tea concentrate into the boiling water. I cleaned the smaller pot and then strained the entire amount of liquid back into it and it just did manage to fill it completely. Note here…steeped hibiscus flowers don’t do well in a garbage disposal unit. I should have composted them. Live and learn. After a little disposer cleaning, I got back to my hibiscus concentrate and funneled it into a sanitized glass container, covered it with sanitized plastic wrap and stuck it in the refrigerator to cool overnight.

Bringing the temp down on the hibiscus tea concentrate.

Bringing the temp down on the hibiscus tea concentrate.

 

 

 

 

The final thing I wanted to accomplish tonight was to attempt to harvest some yeast. If I like the result in this gose, I wouldn’t mind making another gose or a maybe try making a kolsch, before the really cold weather starts coming around. So, for tonight, I poured off some of the trub that was left behind in the carboy that I racked out of and funneled it into a sanitized 1/2 gallon glass jug.

Attempting to harvest some yeast for future use.

Attempting to harvest some yeast for future use.

I topped that off with Culligan bottled water and added a sanitized cap. I’ll let that sit out overnight and separate. I’ll update here tomorrow when I add the hibiscus tea concentrate and further separate the yeast.

11/2/15 update: Added the hibiscus tea to the gose and it looks like a giant jar of cranberry sauce!

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I also decanted the liquid off of the yeast I’m trying to harvest. My understanding is that the yeast is the thin whitish layer on the top of the sediment. I transferred that to a pint jar and added water, We’ll see how that settles.

Transferred yeast to smaller jar and added water.

Transferred yeast to smaller jar and added water.

Yeast settled for harvest.

Yeast settled for harvest.

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Happy New Year! Racking Yooper’s Oatmeal Stout and Washing Yeast

 

Racking Yooper's Oatmeal Stout

Racking Yooper’s Oatmeal Stout

I have racked Yooper’s Oatmeal Stout into two separate buckets to finish. First I racked it all into a bottling bucket, leaving the trub behind. Then I racked 2 gallons of that onto the gingerbread flavoring…and that smelled AWESOME!!!

Racking 2 gallons onto the gingerbread flavoring.

Racking 2 gallons onto the gingerbread flavoring.

Gingerbread flavored vodka base.

Gingerbread flavored vodka base.

 

That left a little less than 3-1/2 gallons plain…I’m calling in 3.3 gallons. The hydromenter reading is 1.019, after correction for temperature, which is slightly higher than where it is projected to finish, but it started a little bit higher, as well.

Hydrometer reading.

Hydrometer reading.

Should be in good shape. The color and flavor seem to be good. Looking forward to the finished product!

I’m about to start the process to wash the yeast and harvest it. If the yeasts I’ve tried in my little cider project don’t do the job, I might use some of the yeast from this batch of stout. Otherwise, I store it in the refrigerator and see if I can find a use for it soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Update 1/2/15: I pitched the yeast from the little starter I was attempting into my 1/2 gallon batch of cider…waiting for signs of renewed fermentation. I might transfer to a larger container and add more cider…maybe.

Drained liquid from yeast washing project (British Ale II from Wyeast) and tranferred the yeast to my flask and added Culligan bottled water.

Update 1/3/15: Tonight, I poured off the liquid for the second time on the Wyeast British Ale II in the washing process. I also made a starter wort in my flask, 800 ml water and 1/4 cup of DME. The SG was only around 1.020, so I added some white sugar and bumped it up to around 1.040 (DME is messy, trying to get it into a flask opening). I chilled the wort to about 70F and poured the harvested yeast into the flask. I’m going to grow the volume on the yeast in the starter and then crash it and store it in the refrigerator until needed. I probably won’t have another brew day for  a few weeks and haven’t decided what it might be yet, much less what yeast I’ll be needing.

Anyway, the starter is pitched and underway.

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Day 158 Yeast Harvest Fail, Try Another

 

Got my starter all ready and aerated. Pitched harvested Edinburgh Ale yeast...nothing.

Got my starter all ready and aerated. Pitched harvested Edinburgh Ale yeast…nothing.

I attempted to harvest the Edinburgh Ale yeast from my Scottish Samhain Pumpkin Ale, after I racked it to secondary. I collected some trub and tried “washing” it and adding it to a beaker of DME boiled with water for ten minutes. No luck after about 24 hours. So, I decided to pitch another expired yeast that I picked up after the yeast class I took awhile back. I shook a vial of American Ale yeast  and pitched it in the same starter beaker.

Overnight, it was showing signs of growth. I swirled it down a few times today.

Success with expired American Ale yeast.

Success with expired American Ale yeast.

This evening, I put the beaker in the refrigerator to crash it. Tomorrow, I’ll transfer it to a jar and keep it refrigerated until I need it. Actually, my next brew is likely to be a porter, so I will have to buy some yeast for that batch. Then, maybe I’ll use the frozen fresh hops I have to do  “wet hops” beer. That will require a little research to find an appropriate recipe to try.

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Day 132 Bottling Hi-Nelson Saison, Diet Root Beer, Boosting Starter

Bottled Hi-Nelson Saison w/Hibiscus, Bottled Diet Root Beer, Harvested Belle Saison yeast starter, bag of grain for Citra Saison.

Bottled Hi-Nelson Saison w/Hibiscus, Bottled Diet Root Beer, Harvested Belle Saison yeast starter, bag of grain for Citra Saison.

Busy day today! Began by pulling the harvested Belle Saison starter from the refrigerator and made it better. Yeast class I attended showed me a couple of things I should fix. I made a new starter wort with DME, chilled down to mid 80’sF, added to my new flask, and oxygenated. Then I decanted the old wort and pitched the yeast slurry into the new wort. I also decanted another harvest jar and added it as well. Put a little sanitized foil over the flask and wrapped a heating pad around it, set on the lowest setting. The yeast really seemed to take off! I hope to cold crash it tonight and pitch it into a Citra Saison tomorrow! Brewing!

Keeping the yeast starter warm.

Keeping the yeast starter warm.

Moving along. Set everything up for bottling…sanitized everything. I”ve done enough photos on bottling before. Suffice it to say, I followed procedure and all went well. The biggest question was about how much corn sugar to add for priming. I wound up with about 5.25 gallons to bottle and used the 5.75oz recommended by Northern Brewer’s calculator. The hydrometer sample was a little foamy, but it looks like the FG is 1.004, after temperature correction. The OG was 1.068, so we wind up with the expected 8.40% ABV. (Woo!) I bottled 31 regular 12 oz bottles and a dozen 22 oz bombers.

This is the Hi-Nelson Saison hydrometer sample after I cold crashed it.

This is the Hi-Nelson Saison hydrometer sample after I cold crashed it.

Since I had everything out for bottling, I went ahead and tried my hand at root beer! I bought extract yesterday. I made a half gallon batch and it was pretty simple, so I did a second 1/2 gallon. Those yielded eleven 12 oz bottles. The last one was a little short, so I added a little water and marked the bottle. I’ll use it as the tester for carbonation. It took 1/2 tablespoon of extract, 2 tablespoons of white sugar, 10 packets of Truvia, and 1/8 teaspoon of  Champagne yeast, rehydrated. Then, warm water to fill the half gallon carboy. Shake to blend well. I used my siphon and bottling cane to fill the bottles. Now we wait and see how it turns out!

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Day 130 Racking the Hi-Nelson Saison & Washing Yeast

Set-up to rack to secondary.

Set-up to rack to secondary.

 

It has been 2 weeks and a few days since I brewed the Hi-Nelson Saison (July 4th). A check with the hydrometer, after temperature correction, shows 1.004 SG. I’ll get a final gravity reading at bottling, but right now, the ABV is looking like 8.40%. The hydro sample is an appropriate color, I think. The aroma is nice…not too pronounced yet, but I’m sure dry hopping will change that! The flavor is good, but a bit boozy at this point. I’m using a bottling bucket for primary fermentation and the trub is above the spigot level, so I’m going to have to use a siphon to rack to secondary. Since I’m dry hopping, I’m racking to another bottling bucket, instead of the carboy.

Hi-Nelson Saison hydrometer sample. Ready to rack to secondary.

Hi-Nelson Saison hydrometer sample. Ready to rack to secondary.

So, here we are a few hours later and I got the racking done. The beer in primary fermentation looks good and I can smell the alcohol.

Opening the primary fermentation bucket.

Opening the primary fermentation bucket.

I made the hibiscus tea in a pitcher with a plunger, designed for mixing, but it did a good job straining the flowers out of the tea.

Hibiscus tea.

Hibiscus tea.

I added the tea to the secondary, another bottling bucket and started the racking process.

Mingling the beer and the hibiscus tea via racking.

Mingling the beer and the hibiscus tea via racking.

I sanitized the packets of Nelson Sauvin hops and a pair of scissors and I had a nylon bag soaking in sanitizer.

Ready for dry hopping

Ready for dry hopping

I put the hops pellets in the bag, tied it off and tossed it in the secondary bucket. The new color is striking!

Hibiscus tea and Nelson Sauvin hops are in and ready to seal.

Hibiscus tea and Nelson Sauvin hops are in and ready to seal.

After racking, I still have well over 5 gallons of beer and a little under a gallon of trub.

I have never tried washing and harvesting yeast before, but I’m going to give it a shot and see how it works. I know that higher alcohol exposure may make this attempt not very viable, but I’m going to see what happens.

I have put the lid and airlock back on the trub and boiled a gallon of water.

Hi-Nelson Trub

Hi-Nelson Trub

 

The water is in a gallon carboy in the refrigerator to cool. I’m following a procedure for which I found an online video. It’s basically adding water, mixing, letting it settle and pouring off the yeast into a smaller container, letting that settle and pouring off into smaller containers, then refrigerating. If I’m lucky, enough viable yeast will survive to make a starter and a test batch of beer. The yeast is Belle Saison.

Chilled the gallon of water down…finishing in an ice bath in the sink.

Chilling boiled water for washing yeast.

Chilling boiled water for washing yeast.

I got it down to about 85F. Belle Saison is good up into the 90’s, so it should be good. Sealed bucket and swished around well. After about 45 minutes (I got distracted), I poured off a little over 1/2 gallon into the 1 gallon carboy. It immediately started separating.

Boiled water added and separation done in fermentation bucket. Poured into 1 gallon carboy.

Boiled water added and separation done in fermentation bucket. Poured into 1 gallon carboy.

After settling, I decanted to four 1-pint size jars and transferred those to the refrigerator.

Four pints of (hopefully) harvested Belle Saison yeast.

Four pints of (hopefully) harvested Belle Saison yeast.

We’ll see how that settles out over the next couple of days. I found a fairly simple looking Citra Saison that I may try some of the harvested yeast on…pinned the recipe to Pinterest. I might make it a half batch to keep the investment lower for the first test.

 

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