Uncategorized

Racking Muscadine-Blueberry Wine

Racking wine to secondary fermentation.

Racking wine to secondary fermentation.

I’ve let the muscadine-blueberry wine go as long as I want now, so I racked it to a carboy tonight. It was in a bottling bucket for primary fermentation, so I tried to pull a sample from the spout to test the SG, but there was too much trub. To rack, I had to use a siphon and penetrate the fruit layer.

I added a crushed Campden Tablet to the carboy and started the racking process. The Campden will hopefully start knocking off the yeast that’s still active. I did get a sample and the SG is at 0.991 (0.990 @70.3F)…I would think the yeast would be done!

SG reading

SG reading

But there is still some airlock activity. After racking, it looks a little lower in volume than I thought, but there was about 14 pounds of fruit, so it shouldn’t be surprising.

A little below volume, but high on alcohol, so I added a gallon of bottled water.

A little below volume, but high on alcohol, so I added a gallon of bottled water. (This is before water addition.)

I decided to add another gallon of Culligan water with a crushed Campden Tablet to bump the volume a little. The ABV is 15.75%, prior to the water addition, so I’m not worried about diluting it a little! The color and flavor are nice, so a couple more months of racking and then a few more in the bottles and I think it will be pretty good.

Looking good...dry, but not bone dry.

Looking good…dry, but not bone dry.

Standard
Uncategorized

Blueberry-Muscadine Wine, Adjustments and Yeast

24 hours after Campden Tablets added. Sugar, water, blueberries and muscadines.

24 hours after Campden Tablets added. Sugar, water, blueberries and muscadines.

Day 2 for the Blueberry-Muscadine Wine project…time to check the OG(Original Gravity), check the acid, add the yeast nutrient, pectic enzyme, and pitch the yeast. I started with the refractometer and got a couple different readings from the sample I took after stirring the must. (Of course, I sanitized everything that touched the must). Anyway, I felt like I was at the 1.090 range,but wasn’t confident, so I took a larger sample to check with the hydrometer later.

Sample for testing acid and getting hydrometer reading.

Sample for testing acid and getting hydrometer reading.

From the sample, I removed 3ml to test the acid. Following the instructions for the acid test kit, it looks like I was at a reading of 0.225; shooting for the range between 0.55 and 0.65. The recipe called for 2-1/2 teaspoons of the acid blend, but I needed the full 2 ounces that I purchased to get to 0.565. At the minimum of the range, but okay. I also added 2-1/2 teaspoons of pectic enzyme and 3 teaspoons of yeast nutrient. Added to the must and stirred in. Then I sanitized the yeast packet and scissors, and pitched the yeast, gently stirring it in.

I resealed the fermentation bucket and cleaned my utensils. Next, I used the rest of my sample to take an OG reading with a hydrometer. It looks like I have a reading of 1.110 at 71.6F, which adjusts for temperature (hydrometer calibrated to 60F) to OG 1.111.

Hydrometer reading.

Hydrometer reading.

I guess I should not have added all the sugar at once, so this is going to be a higher alcohol wine than I wanted, but that’s the way it goes sometimes. I just hope it tastes good! Montrachet yeast is supposed to have an alcohol tolerance of 13%, so if my FG comes in around 1.01-ish, it should be stopping anyway. (The color is good. The unfermented product is so sweet, it’s hard to get a real feel for flavor…but I think it will be good.)

***Update 8/27/15: Continuing to stir every evening, to break up the fruit floating at the top and submerge it all. Getting a nice steady action in the airlock. All appears to be on track. Obviously, it’s still extremely sweet; however, a small sip does have a little more fruit flavor than before, and a little taste of the fermentation.

After stirring down the fruit.

After stirring down the fruit.

Before stirring the floating fruit.

Before stirring the floating fruit.

Update 8/29/15: Stirred down the fruit in the fermentation bucket and noted that the appearance is pretty much the same as the above photos. I wonder if the blueberries that didn’t get crushed are fermenting? They don’t seem to be changing color…hmmm. The sample spoonful definitely has a flavor that has dropped in sweetness another notch.

Update 8/29/15: Continuing to convert sugar to alcohol…definitely a little more tannic feel in the mouth, more alcohol, and drier. I continue to note that the wine is still sweet, but what a difference! I like where this is going…at least, so far.

Again, before stirring down the fruit.

Again, before stirring down the fruit.

 

After stirring down the fruit.

After stirring down the fruit.

Sample for flavor and color.

Update 9/2/2015: Now tasting more like wine and less like sweet, fermenting juice. Photos aren’t showing any real difference, but the flavor is telling the tale!

Standard
Uncategorized

Bottled Belgo Paleo

Bottling!

Ready for bottling!

I just finished bottling the Belgo Paleo Belgian Pale Ale and I wound up with 42-12 oz bottles. I thought I had more corn sugar on hand to prime with, but I only had 3/4 oz. So, I primed with table sugar. The recommended amount for a Belgian Ale is 1.9 to 2.4 atmospheres.With my history of overcarbonating, I looked at the lower end of the scale and the amount of sugar recommended is 2-1/2 oz; I went with a scant 2-1/8 oz. Always feels like a bit of a crapshoot, but we’ll see how THAT works out.

Bottling bucket.

Bottling bucket.

I did get a hydrometer sample again and the FG is confirmed at 1.015. My OG was almost dead-on at 1.060 (recipe says 1.059), but I just couldn’t get to the projected 1.009 FG. So, instead of 6.56%, I wound up with a respectable 5.91% ABV.

Nice color.

Nice color.

Flash makes it hard to see the line is actually 1.014...with temp correction = 1.015 FG

Flash makes it hard to see the line is actually 1.014…with temp correction = 1.015 FG

In an attempt to lessen the chances of overcarbonation, I cleaned all my containers and equipment with a solution of super washing soda from Arm&Hammer, rinsed and sanitized with Starsan. I ran the bottles through the dishwasher AND sanitized with Starsan. Keeping my fingers crossed!

Standard
Uncategorized

Belgo Paleo After 5 Day Dry Hop

 

Trub in Secondary

Trub in Secondary

The Belgo Paleo Pale Ale has been in secondary for awhile now and dry hops were added 5 days ago. This has been a strange brew. I thought I had done a pretty good job of leaving behind most of the trub when I transferred from primary to secondary; however, fermentation appears to have renewed and a new layer of trub is on the bottom. The dry hop addition was contained in a bag.

Floating bag o' hops

Floating bag o’ hops

While some might have disintegrated enough to pass through the bag, it shouldn’t have created the amount of trub that I have now! So, I’m thinking of getting this beer into a tertiary phase and taking another hydrometer sample. I’ll give it a couple of days to settle down and make sure it’s done fermenting. If it still seems to be going, I may have to let it go longer and add some more hops.

Okay, back to the beer…I have now racked the Belgo Paleo again. It turns out that the additional trub was, indeed, dissolved hops from the dry hop bag. I’m down to 3.9 gallons now, but I left the trub behind and I filtered the beer back into the carboy through a small mesh strainer, lined with cheesecloth.

Not a very fine filter, but did well enough.

Not a very fine filter, but did well enough.

The SG did actually drop a *little* more…down to 1.014. Maybe I’ll get this bottled over the weekend. I’m not going to add more hops and lose more volume!

After temp correction, 1.014 SG

After temp correction, 1.014 SG

Made another batch of kombucha today and added another SCOBY to the hotel. I gave a couple to a friend about 10 days ago and she has completed her first batch and has a second going! I know the SCOBYs look weird, but this stuff is good and healthy, so I’m going to keep it rolling and pass on the sodas as much as possible.

Looks weird. but you don't drink the SCOBY!

Looks weird. but you don’t drink the SCOBY!

 

Standard
Uncategorized

I’m a Grandpa! (And General Update on Brews)

IMG_20150419_192135858

Let’s just get this out of the way: Yes, I’m a Grandpa! My grandson was born on April 17, 2015 @11:23 p.m. and weighed in at 7 lbs 13 oz. I’m as proud as I can be!

Okay, back to brewing and fermenting stuff. Three things: Steinpilz Gose, Belgo Paleo Pale Ale, and kombucha.

The Steinpilz Gose has been in the bottles for a couple of weeks now an my friend picked up the rest for kegging  a little over a week ago. I have opened a bottle and tried it and she has tried it from the keg. Unfortunately, she does NOT like mushrooms, so it isn’t really her “thing”, but she said that it is “technically” good. Haha…I’ll take it. I think the bottled version needs more carbonation, but it is not bad. There’s not much aroma, but what I get is that German wheat beer smell with the earthiness from the mushrooms. The flavor is good…definitely has the German character. As for the gose style, I thing the tartness is good, but it could use just a little more salt. The earthy mushroom flavor is very present, but not overpowering. I look forward to trying the kegged version and getting some feedback from some more people (that like mushrooms, hopefully!).

Steinpilz Gose from the bottle after about 2 weeks.

Steinpilz Gose from the bottle after about 2 weeks.

Belgo Paleo. This has been an odd start. The home brew shop guy said the yeast, Safbrew Abbaye, is the one some brewers use for Belgian trippels and quads, so to not let it go crazy…maybe put it in my spare shower and run some cold water into the tub to lower the temperature a little. The first two days, the yeast ripped into the wort…it actually seemed finished after three days. Late at night on day 2, I replaced the blow-off tube with an airlock and moved the carboy to the shower and added water to the tub. The initial temps were around 70-72F. The tub water slowly leaked out over the course of a week. Last night, I took a sample for hydrometer testing and the temp was 68.5F. The thing is, the SG is 1.020 and it is supposed to get down to 1.009. I reached out to my online brewing friends and it was suggested that I should have increased the temperature after the first day or two…exactly opposite of the advice from the LHBS guy. *steam* I have brought the carboy back into the kitchen and need to check it in another week.

Belgo Paleo at S.G. 1.020

Belgo Paleo at S.G. 1.020

Kombucha…I have SCOBY’s to spare and plenty to share! The 1 gallon jars with spigots are working out great for draining off the ready-to-drink kombucha.

Fresh batch, ready to start fermenting.

Fresh batch, ready to start fermenting.

SCOBY Hotel

SCOBY Hotel

Fresh batch, ready to start fermenting.

Fresh batch, ready to start fermenting.

Now I can add the tea, sugar, and water back without having to remove the SCOBY and extra starter kombucha to start the next batch. I am on a fairly regular staggered schedule 2 batches fermenting and 1 batch in the fridge to drink.

In the fridge to drink.

In the fridge to drink.

Standard
Uncategorized

Racking Steinpilz Gose to Secondary Fermentation

Time to rack the gose.

Time to rack the gose.

 

The Steinpilz Gose has slowed way down on the airlock bubbling. I don’t want the porcini mushrooms to rot, so I’m racking to secondary, to finish fermentation without the mushrooms and trub.

Chunk of floating 'shroom. Trub, Time to rack!

Chunk of floating ‘shroom. Trub, Time to rack!

The specific gravity is down to 1.015 and the target is 1.011, so it doesn’t have far to go, but, again, I’m not going to rush it. I still need to get my carbonation issues under control.

Speaking of the carbonation issues, I did my primary fermentation in my glass carboy, instead of my plastic bottling bucket. I also bought a new hose for the racking process and racked to a plastic carboy…a “Bubbler” by Northern Brewer, that was given to me by a brewer friend who doesn’t use it anymore.

Racked to a plastick Bubbler for secondary fermentation.

Racked to a plastick Bubbler for secondary fermentation.

Everything was well-washed and sanitized. I’m hoping for the best when I bottle, but my friend is going to keg a couple of gallons for comparison. I’ve never kegged before, so that’s kind of exciting!

Back to today’s process: everything went smoothly and I wound up with just under 5 gallons. I took a hydrometer sample, as mentioned above and it looked good. I tasted the sample and I think it’s good.IMG_20150228_170311015

1.014 @ 68F = 1.015 SG

1.014 @ 68F = 1.015 SG

I taste the mushroom, but it’s not overpowering. I don’t think the mushroom tea at bottling step will be necessary; but it might need more salt. The original gravity was 1.054 and the current SG of 1.015 puts the ABV at a little over 5%. It should finish around 5.25% ABV. I’m going to let the Gose go for at least 10 days in secondary…maybe 2 or 3 weeks. Maybe a week in tertiary…we’ll see. Right now, I’m feeling pretty good about it. Cheers!

Standard
Uncategorized

Bottling Yooper’s Gingerbread Oatmeal Stout

20 bottles of Yooper's Gingerbread Oatmeal Stout

20 bottles of Yooper’s Gingerbread Oatmeal Stout

Okay, so I finally got the gingerbread version of Yooper’s Oatmeal Stout into bottles! The FG was 1.016 and a 5.25% ABV. The ginger has toned down a little already, since racking. The aroma is nice. The flavor feels a touch weak, as does the color, at this point, but I have hopes!

Hydrometer sample at 71F and 1.015, temp corrected to 1.016

Hydrometer sample at 71F and 1.015, temp corrected to 1.016

I primed the batch at a target of 1.90 gallons @70 degrees with 1-1/8 oz corn sugar…going for 1.8 vols. Should be lower carb than the regular batch…I hope! As with the regular batch, I have a tester bottle that didn’t quite fill. Not counting the testers, I have 28 bottles of regular and 20 bottles of gingerbread…so I was right on a 5 gallon yield.

I have also taken a tip from a friend and tried 3/4″ round Avery lables (#5408)  for identification. It needs work to get them all centered. They aren’t even off consistently in the same direction…going to need to do some tinkering.

Standard