Uncategorized

Day 115 Pasteurizing Soda, First Taste Major Nelson’s IPA

Pasteurized Ginger Bug Pineapple-Mango Soda

Pasteurized Ginger Bug Pineapple-Mango Soda

I kept an eye on my soda bottles all day. There was a build-up of the more pulpy stuff in the necks of the bottles. Around noon, I carefully lifted each bottle and inverted to distribute the contents and put them back down. No explosions…good! I checked the little tester jar and it was getting carb over night, but not until afternoon did I feel it was getting carbed enough. Around 2 pm, I put the tester jar in the fridge and planned to pasteurize around 3 p.m.

I filled my pressure canner with hot water and put it on high heat, loosely covered. Using a digital thermometer, when the water got to 190F, I removed the pot from heat and carefully added the sodas. Covered loosely again, just in case a bottle were to pop. Set the timer for ten minutes. When the timer went off, I carefully removed the bottles to a kitchen towel on the kitchen counter to rest and cool. When cooled off, I’ll transfer the bottles to the refrigerator.

The little tester bottle was chilled at this point, so I gave it a swirl to mix the pulp and drank it. It wasn’t carbed like a Sprite or Ginger Ale, but it was nice and tingly. I definitely get the mango and ginger…really like the flavor. The texture is the part that would be hard to get some people into it, because of the pulp. But overall, it’s good!

I did go ahead and put an airlock on the Wheat RyePA today and moved it to a place to let it go for awhile. The tepache is not yet showing signs of life.

Update: Chilled the ginger-mint bug pineapple-mango sodas and pulled one out to try this evening. The carbonation is good…not too much, but good. The flavor is interesting and I like it. The only odd thing is the amount of pulp…so it’s kind of like a pulpy orange juice/soda hybrid.

Pulpy, but tasty pineapple-mango soda.

Pulpy, but tasty pineapple-mango soda.

Later that evening: Opened my first bottle of Major Nelson’s IPA and wow!!! Head poured creamy and slowly backed down, but never dissipated completely. The aroma was big with hops. The taste was citrus up front that quickly turned to bitter with a resin finish. I’m very happy with how this turned out! I think I finally got the carb right! Technically, this may be my best beer. It is a tad bitter for me, personally, but I think it is exactly where it is supposed to be for the style.  Another couple of weeks in the bottle won’t hurt it, but it is surprisingly good right now!

DSC04842

Halfway through, the head is hanging on nicely.

DSC04841

Nice head on the pour…soft, creamy.

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 112 IPA Sample and Soda Bug Progress

Major Nelson's IPA test bottle.

Major Nelson’s IPA test bottle.

I chilled my partial “tester” bottle of IPA earlier today. This evening, I opened it and poured it slowly through a cheesecloth lined sieve into a glass. I think that process pulled most of the carb into the head, because there was a big head and little carb. The reason for the filtered pour is because it looked like there were some floaters in the beer. Anyway, the aroma and flavor were both good. I’m looking forward to the final product!

The ginger starter for making soda seems to be coming along okay. I did add more water with the second ginger and sugar addition. I made a third ginger and sugar addition today.

Giving the "bug" a swirly every now and then.

Giving the “bug” a swirly every now and then.

Getting s few bubbles in the "Ginger-Mint Bug" for making soda.

Getting s few bubbles in the “Ginger-Mint Bug” for making soda.

The pineapple-mango melomel continues to carboy condition. All seems steady…nice and clear…pretty color. Maybe another month to bottling.

Pineapple-Mango Melomel (Fruit mead). Look at that color!

Pineapple-Mango Melomel (Fruit mead). Look at that color!

I’m hoping to brew this weekend…maybe tomorrow. I’d like to do a Scotch Ale, but the fermentation temperature requirements may be too low for me to control. I’ll consult the home brew shop…maybe a rye of some kind?

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 110 Bottling Major Nelson’s IPA

Major Nelson's IPA

Major Nelson’s IPA

Okay, so I bottled Major Nelson’s IPA today. This is my second all-grain Brew in a Bag (BIAB) beer. This was the “unnamed IPA” recipe from Atlantic Brew Supply for The National Big Brew on May 3, 2014. My name was runner up to “No Way Jose IPA”. I’m sticking with mine.

This IPA includes Falconer’s Fight, Cascade and Simcoe hops and features a Nelson Sauvin dry-hop. The yeast is Mangrove Jack West Coast. The OG was 1.058 and the FG is 1.012, so that yields an ABV of 6.04%.  Based on Northern Brewer’s online priming sugar calculator, I added a tad over 93 grams of corn sugar mixed with about 12 oz of hot, bottled water. The calculator tool called for 93.86 grams, but my scale doesn’t do decimals. Anyway, I made sure it was well dissolved and thoroughly stirred in to my estimated 3.8 gallons of beer to be bottled. I wound up with 40 12 oz bottles. That’s 3.75 gallons. And I did have about a half a bottle left over, so I pretty well nailed the volume with my estimate. I hope that translates to a perfectly carbed IPA! I am encouraged by the aroma, flavor and color. The recipe says to age 30 days. I’m looking forward to it! I’m betting this will be great on July 4th…so I put American Flag crown caps on this batch.

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 109 Racking IPA to Bottling Bucket

 

DSC04716

Since racking off of the trub and dry hops in primary fermentation, the IPA settled and had a fairly thin layer of sediment left on the bottom. In addition, there were some little bits of what I am assuming were hops that somehow made it through. They were floating just below the surface and they did not look like they were going to precipitate out.

Floating bits that I had to filter out.

Floating bits that I had to filter out.

So, I decided to rack to my bottling bucket, filtering through the bag I use for BIAB.

Using (sanitized) BIAB bag to filter.

Using (sanitized) BIAB bag to filter.

That seemed to work well. I now have just under 4 gallons of beer. I’m going to give it the day to settle again and will hopefully get it bottled tonight. If not, then tomorrow.

I did get a small taste from the siphon when I was done. The flavor is bitter, but it is supposed to be…and I’m thinking the flavor is improving.

trubby sample...waiting for it to settle.

trubby sample…waiting for it to settle.

I pulled some additional beer from the bottom of the carboy and put it in a testing tube in the fridge to chill and settle. Once it separates, I’ll pour off the good beer and clean the testing tube, return the beer to the tube and test for the FG.

Update: The sample settled a little more than what is shown in the picture, but after pouring off the good stuff, I was below what I needed for the hydrometer. I took just enough additional through the bottling bucket spigot to get a reading. I’m seeing an FG of 1.012; the OG was 1.058. That makes the  ABV 6.04%. The recipe estimate was 7%, but the actual for the recipe was 4.7%, so I’m in great shape, I think.

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 108 Racking Major Nelson IPA & White’s SEC

Dry hopped Major Nelson, ready for secondary.

Dry hopped Major Nelson, ready for secondary.

Primary has been going for 8 days, the last 4 were dry hopped with Nelson Sauvin. I racked a little over 5 gallons from the bottling bucket that I used for primary fermentation into a big glass carboy.

Racking to secondary.

Racking to secondary.

This batch had a crapload of trub! I wound up with what looks like a little under 4 gallons of beer and gallon or more of trub…dang it!

Spent yeast and hops equals a gallon of trub!

Spent yeast and hops equals a gallon of trub!

Trub up to the gallon mark...maybe a little more.

Trub up to the gallon mark…maybe a little more.

I could have topped it more after the boil, but it would have brought down my SG. I would rather have better beer, than more beer (to some extent…short a full gallon kinda hurts)!

A little under 4 gallons (?) in secondary.

A little under 4 gallons (?) in secondary.

I pulled a small sample to taste…and managed to knock it over. D’oh! I did get a single, small sip and it has a bracing bitterness and very hoppy aroma. So many hops I haven’t had experience with before…it will be interesting! I plan on a few days in secondary; maybe a week, and then bottling. Recipe calls for aging for 30 days, but IPA’s are meant to be consumed pretty fresh, before the hops fade, aren’t they. We’ll see. I’ll check it about 12-14 days after bottling and see how it’s doing. Now…I just need to get the carbonation right!

I also racked a half gallon batch of “White’s Fresh Pressed” Super Easy Cider to secondary with no issues. The SG is 1.007…a little past where I wanted to go with it, but that’s ok. Maybe I’ll back sweeten a little when I bottle.

 

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 107 Dry Hopping the IPA

The airlock has slowed to a crawl on the IPA, after 4 days, so I’m adding the Nelson Sauvin hops pellets for the dry hopping stage. They should be in about 4 days and then I’ll rack to secondary for clearing, if the SG is where it’s supposed to be. I’ll make sure the fermentation is done before bottling.

Nelson Sauvin hops for dry hopping stage

Nelson Sauvin hops for dry hopping stage

Of course, I sanitized everything. I was planning on dropping the hops pellets into a little nylon bag, but decided against it at the last minute. I went ahead and just dropped them in and gave a light stir. I took a tiny bit into the spoon and tasted it and it is very bitter. I hope it will mellow a little bit in that respect. I know IPA’s are supposed to be bitter, but wow! At any rate, the dry hopping is in. The fermenter is resealed.

Nelson Sauvin hops pellets added to the IPA.

Nelson Sauvin hops pellets added to the IPA.

By the way, I like the smell of  hops pellets. I’ve smelled several now and they all have a component in common, with different intensities and subtle differences. I don’t really have the words and experience to really go more in depth, but I will say that there is a distinct difference with the Nelson Sauvin. It will be an interesting beer, for sure.

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 103 The National Big Brew Day & Racking Tepache

 

National Big Brew group toast!

National Big Brew group toast!

The day started out early with getting to the local brewery by 9 a.m. to set up for The National Big Brew event. I did my second BIAB all-grain brew. This beer has some interesting hops: Cascade, Simcoe, Falconers Flight and dry hopping with Nelson Sauvin. There was not a name for this beer, so they had a naming contest. I think mine was the runner up, but I’m going with it anyway: Major Nelson IPA. I love the camaraderie and access to a wort chiller…easier than the ice bath! I was one of about 5 or 6 brewers set up inside the brewery. It was a nice day and  many brewed outside, but it was hot out there!

The Outsiders.

The Outsiders.

New for this brew, my brew buddy let me use her aerator gizmo to aerate at the end…much more effective than rocking and swirling. The process went smoothly…no surprises.

BIAB set up for Mashing in.

BIAB set up for Mashing in.

I started off with a little over 5 gallons of water and, after the saccharification step and mashout, I added 2 gallons for the boil. After the boil, my OG was 1.058 and I did not top off. I wound up with about 5-1/4 gallons anyway…sweet! The recipe estimate for the OG was 1.066 (but their actual was 1.046, so I’m happy with where I would up. I’m estimating that my FG will be around 1.010 with a 6.3% ABV.  Lets see how it turns out!

In line for using the wort chiller...I'm next!

In line for using the wort chiller…I’m next!

Boiling!

Boiling!

I pitched the yeast, a Mangrove Jack West Coast, at 3 p.m., when I arrived home. I did not rehydrate it first…I have been told that it doesn’t really do much other than maybe speed up the fermentation kick-off a little. As of 8 p.m., I’m not seeing any action yet, but I am confident it will happen; probably overnight.

Draining the pineapple (using my BIAB bag)

Draining the pineapple (using my BIAB bag)

After cleaning up from my beer equipment, I checked on my Tepache. The level of fermentation was looking pretty good, so I strained the pineapple skins and core out and I sanitized a one gallon carboy. I added a 12 oz bottle of room temperature Strawberry Blonde Ale to the carboy and added the tepache liquid to it.

Tepache, racked for a couple more days, with a beer.

Tepache, racked for a couple more days, with a beer.

The brewer/fermenter in me said,”Airlock that baby!” So I did. By 8 p.m., I had a nice foam on the top and it looks like a little action in the airlock. This doesn’t have to ferment way out…probably just another day or two. If I decide to bottle any (it would only be around 6 or 8 bottles for all of it), I would definitely need to pasteurize, to avoid bottle bombs There’s going to be a LOT of residual sugar. I’m really enjoying this little experiment!

Standard