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Day 170 Racking East Coast Cascade Waterfall Off of Dry Hops

 

Dry hop bag removed and opened...dried leaf Cascade used for dry hopping in secondary.

Dry hop bag removed and opened…dried leaf Cascade used for dry hopping in secondary.

I’m running a day behind on getting the East Coast Cascade Waterfall American Amber racked off of dry hop…but that never hurt anybody, right? I started at a little before midnight and finished up after midnight. So, I decided to have one of my Scottish Samhain Pumpkin Ales while I worked.

Scottish Samhain Pumpkin Ale...wet the whistle while you work!

Scottish Samhain Pumpkin Ale…wet the whistle while you work!

Side note: The person whose recipe I used for the Scottish ale base, received a package from me with two bottles of the Scottish Samhain Pumpkin Ale (along with a Cherry Belle Saison and a Hi-Nelson w/Hibiscus). I was very happy to see that he drank one of the Scottish Pumpkin Ales and said that he was genuinely impressed! He described it as “Very Scottish, nicely pumpkin. Aroma is almost like pumpkin pie and a fresh pretzel.” It has a …”sturdy backbone, body, and face for the spice to play with.”  Awesome!

Back to the East Coast Cascade Waterfall American Amber Ale: I just set up a tube on one bottling bucket and transferred the contents, after removing the nylon bag with the Cascade dried leaf hops.

Bucket to bucket for racking from secondary to tertiary to settle for a couple days.

Bucket to bucket for racking from secondary to tertiary to settle for a couple days. Hmmm…how did that blue ribbon from my crab apple jelly entry from the NC State Fair sneak into the photo?

All the indicators are positive…I believe this will be a nice, sessionable, easy-drinking brew, with a nice balance of hops and malt…not too bitter. I was pretty reserved with the bittering hops. For a partial mash, experimental small batch, I think this beer is going to be pretty good.

Small sample of East Coast Cascade Waterfall. Tasty!

Small sample of East Coast Cascade Waterfall. Tasty!

After transfer, I have about 2.75 gallons. I believe there will be about 2.5 gallons to bottle, which I should be able to do Monday. I took a small sample to taste, but I added it to the hydrometer sample after a tiny sip. The sample I took for a hydrometer reading was from the dregs and was pretty cloudy, but it came out to 1.014, after temperature correction. I refrigerated the sample to let it crash and settle. I’ll check it again tomorrow and get a better taste, as well.

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Day 91 Brew Day, First All-Grain, Brew in a Bag!

Brew in a Bag (BIAB), all-grain.

Brew in a Bag (BIAB), all-grain.

Today was my first experience with an all-grain brew! I took a class and got supplies a couple of weeks ago and today was a beautiful day for brewing. I probably wouldn’t get another chance for a couple of weeks, so I went for it.  Everything went surprisingly well. The target temperature for the mash in was 150 F. That was supposed to be accomplished by adding the grain to the full volume of water ( 6.25 gallons) heated to 158F. The temperature actually went to 155 and didn’t get down to 150 until the last 15 out of 60 minutes with no heat on.

The set-up.

The set-up.

I dunked and drained the bag a few times. The refractometer showed an SG of around 1.042…supposed to end up at 1.053, so I was a little worried. I put the bag back down in and raised the temp to 168F  to mash out.

Saccharification...ooo!

Saccharification…ooo!

Next, I cut the flame and allowed the bag to drain well…SG still looked low.

Drain the grain.

Drain the grain.

I went ahead with the 60 minute boil and hop additions at 60, 15, 5 and 1 minutes. I also added 1 teaspoon Irish Moss with 15 minutes left to boil. With the concentration from the boil, the SG was up to about 1.062.

Boil.

Boil.

I did the ice tub chill-down of the wort and it went reasonably quickly. I rehydrated the dry yeast in water while I finished cooling the wort. I then transferred the wort to a bottling bucket for primary fermentation. I wound up with just under 5 gallons. I added water to bring it up to about 5-1/2 gallons and the FG nailed the 1.053 target! (Using my hydrometer and correcting for temperature.) The sample was malty/sweet (which will convert) and very tasty. It actually separated pretty quickly and the wort is a nice color.

Nice color in the sample.

Nice color in the sample.

I put the sample in the fridge to look at/taste again later. I pitched the yeast at about 1:45 pm. Over the next few hours, I did not see any action in the airlock and I noticed a small drip around the spigot. I decided around 7:00 pm, that I should go ahead and transfer to another bucket, since efforts to tighten the spigot did not stop the leak. I took advantage of the opportunity to aerate some more in the process of the transfer. I also realized that the temperature in the house had gone up to 77F, so I turned on the A/C. Crossing my fingers that I get some action overnight. I am a little concerned with the temperature fluctuations. The wife will complain about the house being too cold and how much it costs, when she gets home from a business trip in a couple of days. Then the temp will go up again. The yeast’s  upper range is up to 71F  for fermentation temps, ideally. It could have an effect, but it should be ok, at worst. (I hope!)

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Day 90 Tasting Strawberry Blonde & Plain Jane

If you look back through the journal, you will see the lengths to which I went to try and make the Strawberry Blonde a successful brew. Alas, I believe it was all for naught. The Strawberry Blonde is lacking in hops, either in aroma or bittering. The strawberry flavor is best described as musky and muddled, hiding any hint of malt. But the extract sweetness is there. I don’t think aging will help, but I’ll give it a little more time. I compared with a commercially produced strawberry wheat beer produced by Lancaster Brewing Co. and, while I didn’t really like the commercial product either, it was generally better than mine. It did have a strawberry cream soda like flavor to it from the strawberry flavoring.

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A pleasant surprise, on the other hand, was the “Plain Jane Blonde”, small batch.

Plain John Blonde...surprisingly drinkable!

Plain John Blonde…surprisingly drinkable!

It has, by way of the attempt to up the OG, a little strawberry essence to it…just barely. While there are no hops in the aroma, they are there with a slight bitterness. The malt comes through and there is a little sweetness, but it isn’t cloying. It’s actually a pretty drinkable beer! Not my best offering, but not bad. If I were to attempt this recipe again, I would 1) Measure the water more accurately!, 2) Decrease the strawberries from 6 lbs to my original thought of around 2 to 3 pounds and, 3) Add the fruit in secondary, instead of after flameout at 170F.

I also used a free, simple beer label maker program to create a label for the Costa Kona Mocha Latte stout that I think looks passable. I kind of did a similar thing using a different program and printed it on plain paper, cut it out, moistened the back with milk and applied it to a bottle. Oddly enough, it works! Cheers!

BeerLabel Costa Kona

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