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Day 72 Moving American Wheat to Secondary

Nine days after brewing and my citrus infused American Wheat is ready to be transferred to secondary with some additional citrus.

Opening after 9 days in primary

Opening after 9 days in primary

In addition to 1/2 oz of dried sweet orange peel at 2 mins. left in the boil, I’m going to add another 1/2 oz in secondary along with the zest from a large lemon that has been soaking in the refrigerator, in about 1/3 c. white Bacardi rum, for the last 9 days. The rum will also go in.

Racking onto the dries peel, lemon zest and rum.

Racking onto the dried peel, lemon zest and rum.

Dried sweet orange peel and zest from one lemon soaked in 1/3 c. bacardi white run.

Dried sweet orange peel and zest from one lemon soaked in 1/3 c. bacardi white run.

I checked the gravity and the FG is 1.010 at 65 F, so the ABV should be about 4.46%. The sample flavor is nice…I’m looking forward to this one!

Nice color!

Nice color!

Final Gravity is 1.010 and 4.46% ABV.

Final Gravity is 1.010 and 4.46% ABV.

The Cascade hops give a nice bite, but not overpowering. The Citra hops and orange are reinforcing each other in the aroma and flavor. A couple of weeks in secondary and another couple in the bottle and I’m hoping it’s all going to come together nicely for an awesome brew!

Nice color. A little bitter. A good amount of citrus in the aroma and flavor...and more on the way!

Nice color. A little bitter. A good amount of citrus in the aroma and flavor…and more on the way!

Racking...currently, just under 5 gallons.

Racking…currently, just under 5 gallons.

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Day 36 Brewing Dry Stout

Extract, grains, oats and hops for Dry Stout

Extract, grains, oats and hops for Dry Stout

Spent grains and oats

Spent grains and oats

Wort, after grain steep

Wort, after grain steep

The boil was good…no problem with the malt extract and the only hop addition was at the beginning (60 minutes). I moved the wort to a sink with ice water and brought the temperature down to 90F. Poured the wort into a bottling bucket and topped off to 2-1/2 gallon…maybe a little over. I was making sure that I wasn’t measuring the foam, but I may have gone slightly more. The recipe estimated that the OG would be 1.043 and I got 1.036 @72F, adjusted to 1.037 for calibration. This should be a pretty low alcohol brew. The recipe came up with 4.1%. With my lower OG, mine would be 3.54%, if I reach the estimated 1.01 FG.

Last few minutes of the boil

Last few minutes of the boil

I am pleased with the color and the flavor. Now it’s up to the yeast to work its magic! I’m using Safale s-04 yeast. The recipe doesn’t specify and the guy at the brew shop said s-04 would be fine and it is also what I use for some ciders.

Just over 2-1/2 gallons fermenting, not counting foam.

Just over 2-1/2 gallons fermenting, not counting foam.

I pitched half of a packet of the yeast in and sealed it/airlocked. I should have 5 to 7 days in fermentation.

On another topic, I gave the bottles of cider batch #4 a tip upside down and a swirl. Thinking it might wake up the yeast, if there’s any left. That was yesterday. Today, I opened my test bottle. No sound. Poured a very small amount into a glass and resealed the flip top. Color looks good and taste/sweetness are great…but…no carbonation at all. I have read that sometimes it happens 4 or 5 weeks after bottling, so I’ll keep an eye on it. If it never carbs, it will be a nice still cider. I wonder if I could use it in a SodaStream? Hmmm.

Last night, I also opened my first test bottle (ever) of crabapple cider.

Tiny Bubbles!

Tiny Bubbles!

test bottle, cider batch #1

test bottle, cider batch #1

This one was the tester for cider batch #1…what eventually came to be known as Sherlock’s Cumber, Batch #1. This bottle was primed with Munton’s CarTabs, which I did not use on the full batch. This bottle was dry and had a little less carbed than I prefer. I would have liked it more if it had be a little more “crisp”. Not bad for a first batch though. We’ll try some more at New Year’s Eve and see if the bottles primed with priming sugar are any better.

10:15 pm Stout progress: there is pretty aggressive bubbling in the airlock. It goes of about every 9 seconds, but when it goes, it perks several times. This is only my second time brewing beer and first time using the bottling bucket for fermentation. Cider batches and other beer batch were fermented in a 2 gallon primary fermentation bucket and they all seemed to bubble at increasing, then decreasing intervals, but not with the vigor being experienced this time. Just single bubbles in the past. I guess it could be due to the size of the bucket or the type of beer. Whatever the reason, it seems to be fermenting nicely.

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Day 7 Pitching the Yeast in Batch #2

7:15 a.m.     I did see a stray bubble in the airlock on the growler in batch #1, but I think fermentation is pretty much over. The sediment layer is more pronounced in the 1 gallon carboy and the opacity (I had to pay extra for that word) is dropping. It isn’t clear, but the clouds are thinning!

Batch #1 beginning to clear and sediment layer more pronounced.

Batch #1 beginning to clear and sediment layer more pronounced.

Onto batch #2. As soon as I get my son off to school and finish cleaning my kitchen and sanitizing my utensils, I’ll be pitching the yeast. In the meantime, I need to get the boy up and get some former jack o’lantern in the oven! (But that’s a different blog.)

9:00 am     Okay, Batch #2 is ready to pitch. Sanitized my utensils and popped the top on the primary fermentation bucket.

Opening Batch #2 and preparing to pitch the yeast. Pommace bag floating in cider.

Opening Batch #2 and preparing to pitch the yeast. Pommace bag floating in cider.

Removed pommace bag and squeezed juice into the bucket (with sanitized and rinsed hands!). Bloomed Champagne yeast in 1/4 cup of 100 degree water and pitched it in and stirred.

Pitched Batch #2

Pitched Batch #2

By the way, if you have a garden, why not take your pommace leftovers and add them to the soil or toss them into a composter…there must be some worthwhile goodies in there!

Pommace, after squeezing. Good for garden or composter!

Pommace, after squeezing. Good for garden or composter!

Replaced the lid and made sure it was snapped in place. Installed the airlock and we’re ready for action!

Batch #2 ready to ferment.

Batch #2 ready to ferment.

7:45 pm     Later in the afternoon, I spotted a bubble in the airlock on Batch #2. It was only going off about every minute and a half or a little longer. Now it looks like we’re up to about every 8 to 10 seconds.  Whew!

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