Uncategorized

Day 113 Brew Day!!! Something a Little Different. Rye PA?

The set-up.

The set-up.

It’s been a long brew day. I slept late and got a late start. After getting an idea about what I was going to brew, running to the local brew shop, topping of the propane tank and getting ice, I still had to organize, set-up and sanitize! I think I finally turned the burner on at about 2 p.m. I just finished…well, still have some more clean up to do…and it’s 7:45 p.m.

I was hoping to make a scotch ale; however, the recipes and comments I was hearing were all pretty much saying that I needed to be able to maintain a fermentation temperature of 68F for the first week and sometimes down in the 50’s for another 10 days. Since I don’t have anyway of temperature regulation, I decided I needed to go another way. In looking at styles that do better in warmer temperatures, I found a recipe for a wheat beer, with an option for rye, that sounded interesting. So, I started tweaking it and headed for the HBS to get further  input.  The original recipe I found is here:

http://thebrewhut.com/brewblog.php?page=recipeDetail&&filter=brewmaster&id=62&pg=2

I always like to give credit to originator! So, here’s what I did. First, I went with regular wheat, not red. Maybe some other time. I also decided to pick up some Citra hops, because I really liked what they did for a similar brew. I also remembered that I had a little Vanguard hops left in the freezer at home. And rather than go with a Weihenstephaner yeast, I decided to go US-05. This should help with my higher fermentation temperatures. For the honey in the recipe, I opted for orange blossom and instead of Lemon Zinger Tea, I’m going for Lemon zest soaked in vodka for the secondary…maybe some orange zest, too. Maybe I’ll call it “Rye Sense of Humor American RyePA”.

Gots all my pertinents and such.

Gots all my pertinents and such.

On to the brew: I pretty much followed the recipe. There are two hops varieties in addition to the hops I decided to add. Bittering hops at 60 minutes, Cascade. Aroma hops at 30 minutes and 5 minutes, Hallertau and again at 5 minutes.  I added the Vanguard at the 30 minute marks, as well and the citrus at flameout.

My BIAB process went pretty smoothly, except it is hard to nail down that target temperature and regulate it there. I heated the strike water to 168 (a tad higher than I anticipated). I let it come down a little  before adding the grains. The grains only got it down to around 158F. I left the lid off and stirred a lot to try to bring it down to 152F. I went through that a couple time before it was ready to mash out.

Boil in a Bag, all-grain.

Boil in a Bag, all-grain.

The mash out, on the other hand, went smoothly. I hit the temp and I was able to maintain it pretty steadily for 15 minutes. Then it was on to the boil. I started with 7 gallons and went through most of the process as planned.

Dunking and draining...no sparging.

Dunking and draining…no sparging.

DSC04805

 

I did, however, have in my mind that the last two BIAB brews I did have a bunch of trub and tit really cut into the amount of beer I made. So, at the end, I added a gallon of  cold water which, of course, dropped my specific gravity reading.

I decided to pull a gallon of wort and re-boil it with another 1/2 pound of honey and a 1-3/8 oz chunk of piloncillo (Mexican raw sugar). I chilled that down and added it back. The refractometer was reading 1.047…I did a hydrometer check and it was reading 1.050 at 73F…that would be 1.051 corrected for temperature. Anyway,  I took one last refractometer reading and, low and behold, it matched the hydrometer at 1.051! I stuck the rest of the sample in the fridge to check the color later.

The Boil

The Boil

I had already rehydrated the yeast, so I went ahead and pitched it. Then I rocked the fermention bucket for 5 minutes to aerate. I’m going to go ahead and put a blow-off tube on this bucket, because it is pretty full. It would not take much krausen to foul an airlock!

Blow-off, in place and ready.

Blow-off, in place and ready.

Now it’s time to finish up a little cleaning before I yawn myself to sleep!

Update: Sample tube…clear separation. Lots of trub! I really like the flavor of this wort…this has great potential!

Wort hydrometer sample...checking for trub, color, aroma, flavor.

Wort hydrometer sample…checking for trub, color, aroma, flavor.

 

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 26 Two Gallon Stout After Thanksgiving, Pitching Cider #4

Went to Atlantic Brew Supply today. They are off of Hillsborough St. and closer to me than American Brewmaster. While I will take advantage of American Brewmaster when they open in Cary, Atlantic Brew Supply seems to be a much bigger operation. They also have their own brewery, an onsite brew thing for home brewers one Saturday a month and will loan a burner set-up and sell the “recipe of the month” ingredients for 1/2 price. The guy that helped me was laid back, but knowledgeable  and very friendly and helpful. The grains are bulk and priced by the pound…those and a grinder are self service (or they will help). I was pretty impressed.

I bought a small bottle of a no-rinse sanitizer to try, some Safale s-04 yeast and the ingredients and recipe for a Dry Stout. I’ll make the stout after Thanksgiving. Tonight, I’m going to add some honey to cider batch #4…maybe 1/2 cup…since I was a little short on sugar. I’m also going to add some water, maybe a gallon, since I had extra juice. I’m going to separate the cider into two primary fermentation tanks, each with about 1-1/2 gallons of cider, so I can eventually rack at least 2 full gallons. Once they are separated and the honey is added to both with the extra water (heated to dissolve), then I’ll pitch the s-04 yeast. More on that later.

8:00 pm     Followed my plan and opened the PFB on cider batch #4, removed the pommace bag and squeezed the juice out of it. I had sanitized a second PFB, an airlock, some measuring cups and a spoon. I put 4 cups of hot water in a measuring cup and added    4 oz of honey and stirred to dissolve it. I added the honey water mixture to the cider.  I then divided the cider equally between the two buckets. To each, I added another four cups of water. I checked the OG and it was 1.034 @ 70F. Adjusted is 1.035. That seems a little weak. Maybe I raised the volume of liquid too much. I think I’ll add some brown sugar. I did go ahead and pitch the           Safale s-04 yeast, 3 grams in each bucket.

Okay, I added 8 oz of brown sugar to each PFB and stirred well. Checked the OG again and Bucket #1 is 1.052 Bucket #2 is 1.048 at 70F. Adjusted for temp and hydrometer calibration to 1.053 and 1.049.  The flavor is now sweet, but the apple may be a little weak. We’ll have to see how it ferments. I haven’t liked the idea of adding apple juice concentrate (thawed from frozen), but it may be necessary to get some apple flavor back.

Tomorrow might be a good day to go ahead and bottle Cider Batch #2 and try out one of the bottling buckets. Prime with priming sugar…no tablets!!! I’ve done 1/2 teaspoon per bottle or 1 oz per gallon (so about 1-1/2 oz for this batch). Using the bottling bucket, I think I’ll use the option of adding the priming sugar to the bucket. Name…name…name…”TARDIS Cider. Bigger on the Inside.”  I like it.

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 18 Bottling My First Beer!

Sterilized  all my equipment and 16 bottles/caps. Racked beer to another container.

Capping bottle #1.

Capping bottle #1.

Birth of Fawlty Brown Ale!

Birth of Fawlty Brown Ale!

The SG looks like 1.002 at 71 degrees. Adjusted for hydrometer calibration makes it 1.003. With a starting SG of 1.037, that would make the ABV 4.59% This could be off a bit due to the combination of two containers, the PFB and a growler. It looks good, smells good, tastes a tad weak maybe. I don’t know, with no carbonation and no time in the bottle, it may be too soon to make a judgement. The bottling went well and I perfectly filled 12 bottles and they look good!

12 bottles filled and capped.

12 bottles filled and capped.

Should be good in time for Thanksgiving!

Cider batch #3 is bubbling in the airlock at a rate of every 6 to 7 seconds…woo hoo!

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 17 Racking Beer, Pitching Yeast in Cider Batch #3

Racking the beer batch from a PFB (Primary Fermentation Bucket) and a growler to a single PFB to settle for another day before bottling.

Opening the beer batch to rack it.

Opening the beer batch to rack it.

The SG looked like 1.004 to 1.006. Assuming it’s 1.006 and adjusting for room temp at 69 degrees, I come up with 1.007. That would put me in a 4% alcohol by volume range. I can check the SG one more time before priming and bottling to see if the SG drops any lower.  The color looks good and I get the flavor…a mild bitterness. The alcohol is there. Overall, I think I’ll be happy with the results for a first attempt.

I poured off about an inch of liquid and here's the "bottom of the barrel".

I poured off about an inch of liquid and here’s the “bottom of the barrel”.

It *might* be a little weak, in general. I have bottled a single flip-top and primed it with CarTabs, so I can get an idea of the end product ahead of time. There might be a slight variation with an extra day or two to clarify and priming sugar instead of CarTabs at bottling, but it will be a good approximation.

Over a gallon in the PFB plus a test flip-top.

Over a gallon in the PFB plus a test flip-top.

Having combined the growler and 1st PFB worts (or is it technically beer at this point?), it will be interesting to see if airlock bubbles resume at an increased pace, since the yeast that went into the growler was “guesstimated” up front.  This evening, I will be pitching the yeast on Crabapple Cider Batch #3.

6:30 pm     Pulled the pommace bag and squeezed the juice from it. Pitched in about 3 grams of Dry Ale Yeast Safale s-04. Ready to go!

9:30 pm     Doing a little reading and I think the amount of Safale s-04 that I used is sufficient. However, it seems like I’m reading that it is a slower fermenting yeast than Champagne yeast. The PFB is not bubbling perceptably yet, but that may be because of the slower action of this yeast. (I don’t think there are any leaks.) I have read other people commenting that the primary fermentation may take weeks with this yeast. Another person recommended adding some Champagne yeast for peace of mind, but I don’t have any…that’s why I’m using the s-04. I don’t really have time to run to the brew shop, 15 miles away just for a packet of yeast and I have all the brewing going on that I need to keep track of between now and Thanksgiving! I’m not the most patient person, but I may just let Cider Batch # 3 take its time.

I do need to get a question answered though…maybe I’ll hit a forum and post it. What I need to know is: If I am not going to backsweeten my cider, can I just prime and bottle without pastuerizing or stopping the yeast some other way? I read comments about “bottle bombs” that explode because too much fermentable sugar is left in the cider at bottling. If my SG at bottling, before adding priming sugar (or, in my case, Munton’s CarTabs) is 0.990 to 1.000 and I add the recommended priming amount (4 tabs per bottle), then I shouldn’t have to do anything else, right? Age 4 weeks or more after bottling, at room temperature, and refrigerate before drinking? More on that later.

Standard
Uncategorized

Day 7 Pitching the Yeast in Batch #2

7:15 a.m.     I did see a stray bubble in the airlock on the growler in batch #1, but I think fermentation is pretty much over. The sediment layer is more pronounced in the 1 gallon carboy and the opacity (I had to pay extra for that word) is dropping. It isn’t clear, but the clouds are thinning!

Batch #1 beginning to clear and sediment layer more pronounced.

Batch #1 beginning to clear and sediment layer more pronounced.

Onto batch #2. As soon as I get my son off to school and finish cleaning my kitchen and sanitizing my utensils, I’ll be pitching the yeast. In the meantime, I need to get the boy up and get some former jack o’lantern in the oven! (But that’s a different blog.)

9:00 am     Okay, Batch #2 is ready to pitch. Sanitized my utensils and popped the top on the primary fermentation bucket.

Opening Batch #2 and preparing to pitch the yeast. Pommace bag floating in cider.

Opening Batch #2 and preparing to pitch the yeast. Pommace bag floating in cider.

Removed pommace bag and squeezed juice into the bucket (with sanitized and rinsed hands!). Bloomed Champagne yeast in 1/4 cup of 100 degree water and pitched it in and stirred.

Pitched Batch #2

Pitched Batch #2

By the way, if you have a garden, why not take your pommace leftovers and add them to the soil or toss them into a composter…there must be some worthwhile goodies in there!

Pommace, after squeezing. Good for garden or composter!

Pommace, after squeezing. Good for garden or composter!

Replaced the lid and made sure it was snapped in place. Installed the airlock and we’re ready for action!

Batch #2 ready to ferment.

Batch #2 ready to ferment.

7:45 pm     Later in the afternoon, I spotted a bubble in the airlock on Batch #2. It was only going off about every minute and a half or a little longer. Now it looks like we’re up to about every 8 to 10 seconds.  Whew!

Standard