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Bottled Belgo Paleo

Bottling!

Ready for bottling!

I just finished bottling the Belgo Paleo Belgian Pale Ale and I wound up with 42-12 oz bottles. I thought I had more corn sugar on hand to prime with, but I only had 3/4 oz. So, I primed with table sugar. The recommended amount for a Belgian Ale is 1.9 to 2.4 atmospheres.With my history of overcarbonating, I looked at the lower end of the scale and the amount of sugar recommended is 2-1/2 oz; I went with a scant 2-1/8 oz. Always feels like a bit of a crapshoot, but we’ll see how THAT works out.

Bottling bucket.

Bottling bucket.

I did get a hydrometer sample again and the FG is confirmed at 1.015. My OG was almost dead-on at 1.060 (recipe says 1.059), but I just couldn’t get to the projected 1.009 FG. So, instead of 6.56%, I wound up with a respectable 5.91% ABV.

Nice color.

Nice color.

Flash makes it hard to see the line is actually 1.014...with temp correction = 1.015 FG

Flash makes it hard to see the line is actually 1.014…with temp correction = 1.015 FG

In an attempt to lessen the chances of overcarbonation, I cleaned all my containers and equipment with a solution of super washing soda from Arm&Hammer, rinsed and sanitized with Starsan. I ran the bottles through the dishwasher AND sanitized with Starsan. Keeping my fingers crossed!

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Bottling Yooper’s Gingerbread Oatmeal Stout

20 bottles of Yooper's Gingerbread Oatmeal Stout

20 bottles of Yooper’s Gingerbread Oatmeal Stout

Okay, so I finally got the gingerbread version of Yooper’s Oatmeal Stout into bottles! The FG was 1.016 and a 5.25% ABV. The ginger has toned down a little already, since racking. The aroma is nice. The flavor feels a touch weak, as does the color, at this point, but I have hopes!

Hydrometer sample at 71F and 1.015, temp corrected to 1.016

Hydrometer sample at 71F and 1.015, temp corrected to 1.016

I primed the batch at a target of 1.90 gallons @70 degrees with 1-1/8 oz corn sugar…going for 1.8 vols. Should be lower carb than the regular batch…I hope! As with the regular batch, I have a tester bottle that didn’t quite fill. Not counting the testers, I have 28 bottles of regular and 20 bottles of gingerbread…so I was right on a 5 gallon yield.

I have also taken a tip from a friend and tried 3/4″ round Avery lables (#5408)  for identification. It needs work to get them all centered. They aren’t even off consistently in the same direction…going to need to do some tinkering.

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Bottling Day! Yooper’s Oatmeal Stout and a Little Cider

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Left: cider. Right: Yooper’s Oatmeal Stout.

 

Okay, so somehow I was thinking 3.8 gallons on the Yooper’s Oatmeal Stout (plain), instead of 2.8 gallons. So, I overestimated the number of bottles and caps I needed. More importantly, I overestimated the amount of corn sugar I needed for priming. Since I have had some overcarbonated batches in the past, I was hoping to go on the low side of the scale (1.7 vols) for this batch. Instead, I wound up in the mid-range (2.0 vols). Unfortunately, all the work and high hopes for this batch may have just been ruined by a mental fart. I’m sure it will be drinkable, but is much more likely to overcarb now, based on my history. I’ll try to get it right on the gingerbread flavored batch when I bottle it.

The 4.59% ABV is a little lower than the 4.85% expected, but no problem. The hydrometer came out at 1.021…a tad higher than anticipated, but it had not really changed in awhile, so it should be done. Looks good, smells good, and tastes good.

I wound up with 29 bottles and the last one was a ounce or so short. I marked that one with an “X”, so I would know to use it first. All bottles are marked “YOS”. Additionally, I have 9 bottles capped with “Oxygen Absorbing” caps. I was short on regular caps and my closest local home brew shop isn’t open today; plus, I was planning on cellaring a number of bottles anyway, to see how well they age.

Finally, I had a half gallon of cider to bottle. This is my little experimental batch of White House brand “Fresh Pressed” apple cider and East Coast Ale yeast. The color and clarity are good. Strangely, it appeared to be holding some carbonation in the carboy. Was my airlock stuck somehow? The last bottle was a little short, so I have 4 bottled and one uncapped and in the refrigerator. I may have to give this batch just a few days at room temperature and then refrigerate it. Not enough to mess with pasteurizing. The flavor is a little tart and a little sweet, but a tad bland, in general. I have heard of people dropping a pellet of hops in a bottle…hmmm. I think I’ll do that with the open one and try it!

So, I added a little fresh cider to top off the short bottle and dropped a couple Kent Golding pellets in the bottle and capped it. I’ll leave it at room temperature. Adding the cider should effectively prime and slightly sweeten the finished product.

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Bottled East Coast Cascade Waterfall American Amber Ale

Bottled hop experiment, East Coast Cascade Waterfall American Amber Ale.

Bottled hop experiment, East Coast Cascade Waterfall American Amber Ale.

I’m running a little behind, but I finally knocked out bottling the East Coast Cascade Waterfall American Amber Ale. I estimated about 2.5 gallons and used Northern Brewer’s priming calculator for corn sugar and an American amber. I tried to check the temperature with my digital thermometer and the battery was dying. I had to use a dial thermometer. The temp was about 72F. The FG was 1.013 and the ABV is 5.51%. So the recommended amount of corn sugar was 2 oz  for 2.3 volumes. I mixed the corn sugar with some hot bottled Culligan water to dissolve and then added enough cold to top it to 12 oz. I used a sanitized long spoon and stirred it into the beer.  Bottling went smoothly and it yielded 28 twelve ounce bottles. That means I had 2.65 gallons, so my guess was pretty close. So, that’s the last thing I had fermenting. I have some cider in long term bulk conditioning that I’ll probably not bottle until sometime next year. I don’t anticipate brewing again until after the holidays…pretty full weekends through New Year’s Day. Aside from some tasting notes, this should be a wrap for a few weeks. Cheers!

 

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Day 143 Bottling Citra Belle Saison

Time to start bottling the Citra Belle Saison.

Time to start bottling the Citra Belle Saison.

I figured about 4.75 gallons for bottling and, using Northern Brewer’s priming calculator, I underestimated (on purpose) a little and used 6.0 ounces of corn sugar. Then, when I racked the beer onto the priming sugar, I only got 4-1/2 gallons. I decided to add a quart of bottled water to make up the difference and keep the priming sugar about right. Somehow, it would up back at the 5 gallon mark! anyway, the FG came out to 1.001, after temperature correction. The OG was 1.047, so we should have 6.04% ABV. I filled 29 twelve ounce bottles and 12 twenty-two ounce bottles.

Here's the bulk of it.

Here’s the bulk of it.

I have to say, when I removed the dry hops bag, after I let it drain, I squeezed it out into a measuring cup and it smells AWESOME! I love the smell of Citra hops! And the little squeezed stuff tasted great, too! I also stuck the the hydrometer sample into the fridge to look at clarity later and sample. So far, it’s looking, smelling and tasting good. First sample bottle should be right after Labor Day.

Also did a little organizing of my “cellar”…such as it is. It’s not an ideal situation, but it’s what I have. A lot of my inventory is comprised of a few of this and a few of that. The Hi-Nelson Saison with Hibiscus and the Citra Belle Saison are the largest quantities and there’s a fair amount of Major Nelson IPA and Strawberry Blonde.

Inventory.

Inventory.

Checked on some local wild grapes today…picked over half of a pound in about 5 minutes. Need to go check my main source…soon!

10:30 pm and I checked the SG on my Second Runnings  Ginger Beer. It is at 1.06 at 72.6F=1.061…just not moving. My last effort is to add 1/2 teaspoon yeast nutrient and pitch the rest of the Champagne yeast, after rehydrating. Everything is all sanitized and back in place…let’s see what happens.

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Day 132 Bottling Hi-Nelson Saison, Diet Root Beer, Boosting Starter

Bottled Hi-Nelson Saison w/Hibiscus, Bottled Diet Root Beer, Harvested Belle Saison yeast starter, bag of grain for Citra Saison.

Bottled Hi-Nelson Saison w/Hibiscus, Bottled Diet Root Beer, Harvested Belle Saison yeast starter, bag of grain for Citra Saison.

Busy day today! Began by pulling the harvested Belle Saison starter from the refrigerator and made it better. Yeast class I attended showed me a couple of things I should fix. I made a new starter wort with DME, chilled down to mid 80’sF, added to my new flask, and oxygenated. Then I decanted the old wort and pitched the yeast slurry into the new wort. I also decanted another harvest jar and added it as well. Put a little sanitized foil over the flask and wrapped a heating pad around it, set on the lowest setting. The yeast really seemed to take off! I hope to cold crash it tonight and pitch it into a Citra Saison tomorrow! Brewing!

Keeping the yeast starter warm.

Keeping the yeast starter warm.

Moving along. Set everything up for bottling…sanitized everything. I”ve done enough photos on bottling before. Suffice it to say, I followed procedure and all went well. The biggest question was about how much corn sugar to add for priming. I wound up with about 5.25 gallons to bottle and used the 5.75oz recommended by Northern Brewer’s calculator. The hydrometer sample was a little foamy, but it looks like the FG is 1.004, after temperature correction. The OG was 1.068, so we wind up with the expected 8.40% ABV. (Woo!) I bottled 31 regular 12 oz bottles and a dozen 22 oz bombers.

This is the Hi-Nelson Saison hydrometer sample after I cold crashed it.

This is the Hi-Nelson Saison hydrometer sample after I cold crashed it.

Since I had everything out for bottling, I went ahead and tried my hand at root beer! I bought extract yesterday. I made a half gallon batch and it was pretty simple, so I did a second 1/2 gallon. Those yielded eleven 12 oz bottles. The last one was a little short, so I added a little water and marked the bottle. I’ll use it as the tester for carbonation. It took 1/2 tablespoon of extract, 2 tablespoons of white sugar, 10 packets of Truvia, and 1/8 teaspoon of  Champagne yeast, rehydrated. Then, warm water to fill the half gallon carboy. Shake to blend well. I used my siphon and bottling cane to fill the bottles. Now we wait and see how it turns out!

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