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Racking There Gose Sea Breeze and Blueberry-Muscadine Wine

Racking the gose base onto the grapefruit zest.

Racking the gose base onto the grapefruit zest.

Fermentation seems to have slowed way down on the “There Gose Sea Breeze” beer and I’m trying to get it done for Thanksgiving, so I racked it today. Problem: my Blueberry-Muscadine Wine is in my other carboy. I need a third to make this process work. So, I went to a local home brew shop to check out my options. I decided to go with a 5 gallon Better Boy brand plastic carboy with a port on it for a tap. That will allow me to use it like a bottling bucket, rather than having to use a siphon. Maybe this will reduce the chance for infection by one more function…maybe. Seems like a good system, but the tap is a bit tricky to install and it ain’t cheap. The carboy itself was about $28. Then, the tap comes as two separate pieces that add up to about another $30. Then, I needed the special size of stopper for the top, some 1/2″ tubing and a 1/2″ diameter bottling cane. Altogether, with tax, it was about $85.

After I got everything organized, cleaned, put together, and sanitized, things went pretty smoothly. I went with the 5 gallon Better Boy because I plan to generally use it for secondary fermentations and, at that point, usually I’m down in that range. When I racked the wine, I got a nice, full 5 gallons.

Blueberry-Muscadine Wine racked for some bulk conditioning.

Blueberry-Muscadine Wine racked for some bulk conditioning.

I then squeaked out about another quart, into a half gallon glass jug. I may go ahead and bottle that in a 22 oz bomber, when I get a chance. There’s too much head space there and I don’t want it to oxidize.

Once the wine was transferred and the glass carboy it was in was cleaned and sanitized, I prepared to rack the beer into it. I set-up the siphon and hose. Next, I added the grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer to the carboy and began racking the beer onto it.

Grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer.

Grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer.

Once that was all squared away, I started making the hibiscus tea.

Unsweetened, dried hibiscus flowers.

Unsweetened, dried hibiscus flowers.

I used a quart of hot Culligan (bottled) water and 5 oz of dried hibiscus flowers to a 2 quart stainless steel sauce pan.

Steeping to a beautiful concentrate.

Steeping to a beautiful concentrate.

Since I didn’t have one a bit bigger, I went ahead and brought another quart of the water to a boil in a big stainless stock pot. After the hibiscus flowers were brought to a boil, I covered them and turned off the heat. The other water boiled for a few minutes and, after the flowers steeped for 10 minutes, I strained the tea concentrate into the boiling water. I cleaned the smaller pot and then strained the entire amount of liquid back into it and it just did manage to fill it completely. Note here…steeped hibiscus flowers don’t do well in a garbage disposal unit. I should have composted them. Live and learn. After a little disposer cleaning, I got back to my hibiscus concentrate and funneled it into a sanitized glass container, covered it with sanitized plastic wrap and stuck it in the refrigerator to cool overnight.

Bringing the temp down on the hibiscus tea concentrate.

Bringing the temp down on the hibiscus tea concentrate.

 

 

 

 

The final thing I wanted to accomplish tonight was to attempt to harvest some yeast. If I like the result in this gose, I wouldn’t mind making another gose or a maybe try making a kolsch, before the really cold weather starts coming around. So, for tonight, I poured off some of the trub that was left behind in the carboy that I racked out of and funneled it into a sanitized 1/2 gallon glass jug.

Attempting to harvest some yeast for future use.

Attempting to harvest some yeast for future use.

I topped that off with Culligan bottled water and added a sanitized cap. I’ll let that sit out overnight and separate. I’ll update here tomorrow when I add the hibiscus tea concentrate and further separate the yeast.

11/2/15 update: Added the hibiscus tea to the gose and it looks like a giant jar of cranberry sauce!

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I also decanted the liquid off of the yeast I’m trying to harvest. My understanding is that the yeast is the thin whitish layer on the top of the sediment. I transferred that to a pint jar and added water, We’ll see how that settles.

Transferred yeast to smaller jar and added water.

Transferred yeast to smaller jar and added water.

Yeast settled for harvest.

Yeast settled for harvest.

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Racking Muscadine-Blueberry Wine

Racking wine to secondary fermentation.

Racking wine to secondary fermentation.

I’ve let the muscadine-blueberry wine go as long as I want now, so I racked it to a carboy tonight. It was in a bottling bucket for primary fermentation, so I tried to pull a sample from the spout to test the SG, but there was too much trub. To rack, I had to use a siphon and penetrate the fruit layer.

I added a crushed Campden Tablet to the carboy and started the racking process. The Campden will hopefully start knocking off the yeast that’s still active. I did get a sample and the SG is at 0.991 (0.990 @70.3F)…I would think the yeast would be done!

SG reading

SG reading

But there is still some airlock activity. After racking, it looks a little lower in volume than I thought, but there was about 14 pounds of fruit, so it shouldn’t be surprising.

A little below volume, but high on alcohol, so I added a gallon of bottled water.

A little below volume, but high on alcohol, so I added a gallon of bottled water. (This is before water addition.)

I decided to add another gallon of Culligan water with a crushed Campden Tablet to bump the volume a little. The ABV is 15.75%, prior to the water addition, so I’m not worried about diluting it a little! The color and flavor are nice, so a couple more months of racking and then a few more in the bottles and I think it will be pretty good.

Looking good...dry, but not bone dry.

Looking good…dry, but not bone dry.

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Racking to Tertiary: Mowing Mt. Ranier

Racking to tertiary for clearing.

Racking to tertiary for clearing.

Looks like the Mowing Mt. Ranier Ale, Cherry-Citra “lawnmower beer” is done with secondary fermentation and dry hopping. I let it go a couple of extra days, just in case, because the cherries in secondary DID restart fermentation.

Secondary-fermented red cherries...giving up flavor and color.

Secondary-fermented red cherries…giving up flavor and color.

Once the small amount of krausen worked itself out, much of it precipitated to the bottom, just leaving the cherries floating. (Note: my little 1/2 gallon blackberry recipe looks good, too and I racked it as well. Not as much color imparted by the blackberries, but the flavor is interesting…good.)

After settling under refrigeration, the blackberry sample.

After settling under refrigeration, the blackberry sample.

Racked my little blackberry batch, too.

Racked my little blackberry batch, too.

The red cherries did impart some color that I would not have gotten if I had used all Mt. Ranier cherries; however, it IS a nice color. I removed a sample for tasting and to get an SG reading. The color, as I said, is nice. The flavor has pronounced cherry and citra, without being sweet or heavy.

Transferred back to clean carboy to clear for a couple of days.

Transferred back to clean carboy to clear for a couple of days.

Sample of Mowing Mt. Ranier Cherry-Citra Ale

Sample of Mowing Mt. Ranier Cherry-Citra Ale

The SG got down to 1.007, so the alcohol should be 4.73% ABV. That’s actually a little lower than the recipe estimated, but I’m actually very happy with that.

I cleaned and sanitized a bottling bucket and racked into it. I dumped the cherries, hops bag, and the small amount of trub that made it through the last racking. I washed, rinsed, and sanitized the carboy again and transferred the beer back into it. Looks good…pretty clear. I’ll give it a couple of days to settle and then it should be good to bottle.

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Belgo Paleo After 5 Day Dry Hop

 

Trub in Secondary

Trub in Secondary

The Belgo Paleo Pale Ale has been in secondary for awhile now and dry hops were added 5 days ago. This has been a strange brew. I thought I had done a pretty good job of leaving behind most of the trub when I transferred from primary to secondary; however, fermentation appears to have renewed and a new layer of trub is on the bottom. The dry hop addition was contained in a bag.

Floating bag o' hops

Floating bag o’ hops

While some might have disintegrated enough to pass through the bag, it shouldn’t have created the amount of trub that I have now! So, I’m thinking of getting this beer into a tertiary phase and taking another hydrometer sample. I’ll give it a couple of days to settle down and make sure it’s done fermenting. If it still seems to be going, I may have to let it go longer and add some more hops.

Okay, back to the beer…I have now racked the Belgo Paleo again. It turns out that the additional trub was, indeed, dissolved hops from the dry hop bag. I’m down to 3.9 gallons now, but I left the trub behind and I filtered the beer back into the carboy through a small mesh strainer, lined with cheesecloth.

Not a very fine filter, but did well enough.

Not a very fine filter, but did well enough.

The SG did actually drop a *little* more…down to 1.014. Maybe I’ll get this bottled over the weekend. I’m not going to add more hops and lose more volume!

After temp correction, 1.014 SG

After temp correction, 1.014 SG

Made another batch of kombucha today and added another SCOBY to the hotel. I gave a couple to a friend about 10 days ago and she has completed her first batch and has a second going! I know the SCOBYs look weird, but this stuff is good and healthy, so I’m going to keep it rolling and pass on the sodas as much as possible.

Looks weird. but you don't drink the SCOBY!

Looks weird. but you don’t drink the SCOBY!

 

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Follow-Up on Day 160 Cider

Back on October 1, 2014, (Identified as “Day 160” in my journal, when I was still numbering my posts), I racked a cider that I made from crab apples, pears, Pink Cripps and Ginger Gold apples into four 1/2 gallon jugs for bulk aging/conditioning. The cider was nice and clear and I was confident that they were finished fermenting. I stuck them away in a corner and ignored them until today. I decided to pull a jug out and check it. I saw a little dark streak on the side of the bottle…could have been from a drip when I transferred the cider. It was obviously a drip that had dried and turned dark and sticky. There was a very fine covering one bottom of the jug. When I opened the screw cap, it was immediately apparent that additional fermenting had carbed the jug and I had a gusher!

I retrieved the other three jugs and bled off the excess carb from all 4 jugs and lightly screwed the caps back down, rinsed them off, and put them in the refrigerator.  One of the four didn’t really gush…not sure why. I poured a small amount into a glass to taste. It’s pretty dry, but the flavor is nice. Maybe I won’t bother bottling…just keep the jugs refrigerated and serve out of them. I did add a little sprinkle of Truvia to sweeten the glass I poured and I liked it better. Backsweeten or no? Maybe just sweeten to taste when poured, as suggested by some cider-makers. It seems a little trashy, but, hey, it works.

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Day 151 Racked the Cider and Wine Again, Washed Crab Apples

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Racked again.

The crab apples have been outside in a bucket for several days and it looks like some squirrels or raccoon nibbled a few.  I decided I better move them inside and go through them. I washed them and picked out a couple of handfuls of ones that were beginning to rot. While I was at it, I went ahead and weighed what I have and it’s a little under 21-1/2 lbs. That’s after a batch of jelly and a 2 gallon batch of  cider (half of which was Pink Cripps Apples).

Washed and sorted crab apples. Over 20 lbs.

Washed and sorted crab apples. Over 20 lbs.

After that, I went ahead and racked my muscadine wine and cider batches to continue on their quest for finishing fermentation and achieving clarity. The processes went smoothly and all seems to be on track. Colors are nice!

Pretty color of red for the wine!

Pretty color of red for the wine!

The Montrachet yeast appears to flocculate well.

Wine trub. Fairly stable.

Wine trub. Fairly stable.

Careful racking leaves the trub almost undisturbed. The Edinburgh Ale yeast I used in the cider is a little less settled and required a little more finesse, but I managed pretty well, I think.

Racked cider and empties.

Racked cider and empties.

Amazingly, shortly after racking, a new sediment layer was obvious, especially on the cider. I haven’t done cider in awhile and I’ve forgotten that they require racking so many times before their final clearing.  But they do eventually become beautifully clear and golden! Eventually, I’ll bottle carb and condition the cider. The muscadine wine should wind up beautiful as well. It will be bottled in 22 oz beer bombers, unless someone convinces me otherwise, and aged for a minimum of two years. Geez, the wait for wine is agonizing, isn’t it?

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Day 77 Goosing the Strawberry Blonde and Bottling the Wheat Citra Citrus

Opened strawberry blonde after 24 hours to inspect. (I drew off the gallon for DME addition from the spigot.)

Opened strawberry blonde to add DME wort. (I drew off the gallon for DME boil from the spigot.)

A busy day today. On the recommendation of some people on http://www.homebrewtalk.com, I decided to make a run back to the brew shop and get some dry malt extract (DME) to bump the specific gravity of the strawberry blonde and plain blonde brews that I did yesterday. The specific gravity was 1.034 at 75F (1.035)…well below the target of 1.053. I’ve done this enough now that I think I’m taking the measurement correctly and it could be due to the higher volume that I wound up with…a total of about 7-1/2 gallons. There’s 1-1/2 gallons of plain blonde ale and about 6 gallons of strawberry blonde (including the 6lbs of strawberries). As of late morning, the main bucket was gurgling nicely and the blow off is seeing some action, but not out of control. The plain blonde in the small bucket is just starting to see some action.

At the home brew shop, they crunched the number for me and concurred that 3 lbs of DME should put me back on target and, using some of the existing wort, will lover my yeast count a little, but will keep me from increasing the already high volume in the main bucket.

So, at home again, I sanitized a 1 quart measure and removed a gallon of wort form the strawberry blonde. I put the wort into a stock pot and brought it to a boil. I added the DME, while stirring, until it was dissolved and incorporated. Watching carefully for boil over, I boiled for 15 minutes.

Drew off 1 gallon of strawberry blonde wort. Added 3 lbs DME at boil.

Drew off 1 gallon of strawberry blonde wort. Added 3 lbs DME at boil.

I skimmed off a few suds and then chilled the DME wort to 75F in an ice bath in the kitchen sink.

Ice bath chill.

Ice bath chill.

I measured the wort at 17 cups and divided that between a total of 7-1/2 gallons of wort (I just realized that I didn’t account for the gallon that I took out…dang. Shouldn’t matter too much, though.). I put 13-1/2 cups of the DME wort into the strawberry blonde fermentation bucket and 3-1/2 cups in the plain blonde bucket. The only problem is that the SG …what I will be using for my OG is still under what we worked out. It is just 1.040 @ 75F (1.041)…and I’m second guessing my abilities on the hydrometer reading thing. If I’m accurate though, and I attain the 1.010 that is estimated, then the ABV will be 4.07%. It’s not optimal, but it is acceptable. The sample looked and tasted pretty nice.

Strawberry blonde hydrometer sample

Strawberry blonde hydrometer sample

A little muddy at this point, but I think fermentation and the process will clear it up nicely.  Cleaned up and prepared for bottling my American Wheat Citra Citrus. The fermentation resumed pretty quickly on the blonde ales.

Blow off action.

Blow off action.

On to the bottling…all the usual bottle washing/sanitizing, equipment sanitizing. I’m using some of my newly acquired bottles.

Nice, clean bottles.

Nice, clean bottles.

Thankfully, they are in decent boxes with six-pack holders for dividers. The box flaps and handles are in a little rough shape on some, but not destroyed…definitely usable. I could use an empty bottle box or two for the loose bottles that I have. I should ask at the brew shop if they sell the boxes only, next time I go there.

Anyway, the bottling went smoothly. I filled a case and capped it and then did the second one and capped it. I did get a yield of exactly two cases…the last bottle was a struggle.

First case of the American Wheat Citra Citrus.

First case of the American Wheat Citra Citrus.

I marked it, just in case it had any trub in it. Because I racked pretty carefully a couple of days ago though, it was all rather clear.

Nice and clear American Wheat Citra Citrus...ready to bottle.

Nice and clear American Wheat Citra Citrus…ready to bottle.

The color looks good…a little dark, but it IS an extract recipe, so that’s expected. The flavor has a great citrus punch with a really nice hop bitterness…not overpowering, though.

Sample of American Wheat Citra Citrus...very encouraged!

Sample of American Wheat Citra Citrus…very encouraged!

And the aroma is a-maz-ing!!! The combination of the citra hops late additions and the citrus work very well together! I am VERY much looking forward to the first bottle of this batch! I didn’t check the SG before bottling, but I did check it at the final racking and I don’t think it would have changed since then. It was 1.010@72F (1.011) at that time. I’m going with that as the FG. The OG was 1.044@75F (1.045), so the ABV would be 4.46%, which is very close to the estimated 4.4% ABV.

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