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There Gose Sea Breeze Ready to Drink

There Gose Sea Breeze

There Gose Sea Breeze

I was pushing it to get this beer ready for Thanksgiving at the beach. As a reminder, I used dried hibiscus flowers to make a tea concentrate to mimic the color and flavor of cranberry, and vodka soaked grapefruit zest to complete the attempt to tie the beer to a Sea Breeze cocktail. Since we spend Thanksgiving at the beach, the Sea Breeze name ties it to our Thanksgiving location and the cranberry flavor and color evokes the holiday. Today is the Sunday before Thanksgiving, I’m at the beach, and I’m testing a bottle that I refrigerated for 24 hours.

The result? I’m declaring a success! The color is nice…maybe slightly pale. It’s not clear, but that’s expected in a wheat beer. It just makes it look look more like a cranberry jelly. The aroma is hard to describe…but it’s a nice fruity, almost candy scent. The flavor is subtly salty with a tang in the finish. I think there’s a little bitterness/sharpness from the grapefruit zest. I’m not sure if the coriander is really contributing much…but maybe it’s just blending well and doing that “Je ne se crois” thing. The carb is very good, with a white, thin layer retained throughout the drink. I was concerned that I bottled too soon and that it might overcarb, but it’s good. When I get home, I think I’ll refrigerate what’s left, so that it stops or slows any possible additional carbing.

As usual, I’ll be responsible for cooking and carving the Turkey. I’ll also make a broccoli casserole. I have a batch of my traditional Scottish shortbread  https://mmmfoodies.wordpress.com/2015/11/14/traditional-scottish-shortbread/

and, for the first time, I will Make my Dad’s Yeast Rolls

https://mmmfoodies.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/my-dads-rolls/

…something I tried last year and failed. This year, I have the right recipe and I have tested it successfully, twice. And with the beer to toast, it should be a great meal! I feel like this style of beer will compliment the big meal and cut through some of the richness. It may also contribute to the after-meal nap!

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

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Bottling There Gose Sea Breeze and Wine Update

Racking the gose to a bottling bucket.

Racking the gose to a bottling bucket.

With two weeks and one day to go until Thanksgiving, I’m counting on the “There Gose Sea Breeze” being done with fermentation, so I can bottle it. I did do an SG check and it was 1.015 still,

FG is 1.015 after temperature correction.

FG is 1.015 after temperature correction.

so…fingers crossed. I bought new bottles and made sure everything was washed well, and sanitized. I hope it carbs reasonably for Thanksgiving. I’m sure I’ll have plenty left for Christmas and New Year’s Eve…there’s 49 twelve ounce bottles.

Bottled and ready to carb!

Bottled and ready to carb!

I did the calculations for priming sugar a bit low, on purpose…I have a history of overcarbing. Instead of over 3.0 vols, which is supposedly what the style should be, I went with 2.4 vols and 4 ounces of sugar.

Two other quick notes: First, I worked up a recipe for what I want my next project to be: Fluffernutter Sandwich Stout. Looking forward to trying to brew it between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. That way, it should be ready to drink starting late January. I will be posting the recipe and results here when I get to it.

Second, I took the small jug of Blueberry-Muscadine Wine and topped off the 5 gallon carboy, to reduce the head space.

Making the head space smaller.

Making the head space smaller.

The rest of the jug was bottled in a 22 oz “bomber”. The bulk will go for longer term conditioning. When I topped it off though, it got kind of fizzy, so I added another crushed Campden Tablet to it. I also double-checked the airlock to make sure it wasn’t stuck.  There’s even a little left over for me!

Sample!

Sample!

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Checking the Specific Gravity on There Gose a Sea Breeze

Hydrometer Sample

Hydrometer Sample

After I racked to secondary, added the grapefruit zest and hibiscus tea concentrate, there seemed to be some additional fermentation happening. It wasn’t much…in fact, I was afraid the little white bubbles were going to turn out to be an infection. However, they did eventually fade away.  The OG was supposed to be 1.062, and it came in at 1.063. The current SG reading is 1.014 with a temperature of 72.8F.

Hydrometer reading.

Hydrometer reading.

After temperature correction for the hydrometer, the actual SG is 1.015, which is .001 above expected FG. Considering that the OG was .001 high, fermentation could be done.

The thing is, I really want this beer to be carbed and ready to drink by Thanksgiving, which is about 2-1/2 weeks away and carbing will likely take at least 10 days. I’d rather give it a month, but it is what it is. So, just in case the fermentation isn’t COMPLETELY done, and, considering my history with over-carbonation…I think I will bottle in new bottles, underestimate the priming sugar, and cross my fingers.

Regarding the beer’s other characteristics, I am hopeful. The sample is a pretty cranberry color, the front end is appropriately a little salty (but not overly so), then there’s tart, followed by a little sour in the finish. The thing is, I don’t know how to describe the aroma or the flavor. I think the hibiscus is giving it a little cranberry character, but I’m not sure how the coriander and grapefruit zest are influencing the flavor. There’s obviously a blended flavor there. I just don’t have the palate and experience to put it into “proper” tasting terminology. But I like it. I really look forward to getting some feedback from some more experienced brewers.

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Racking There Gose Sea Breeze and Blueberry-Muscadine Wine

Racking the gose base onto the grapefruit zest.

Racking the gose base onto the grapefruit zest.

Fermentation seems to have slowed way down on the “There Gose Sea Breeze” beer and I’m trying to get it done for Thanksgiving, so I racked it today. Problem: my Blueberry-Muscadine Wine is in my other carboy. I need a third to make this process work. So, I went to a local home brew shop to check out my options. I decided to go with a 5 gallon Better Boy brand plastic carboy with a port on it for a tap. That will allow me to use it like a bottling bucket, rather than having to use a siphon. Maybe this will reduce the chance for infection by one more function…maybe. Seems like a good system, but the tap is a bit tricky to install and it ain’t cheap. The carboy itself was about $28. Then, the tap comes as two separate pieces that add up to about another $30. Then, I needed the special size of stopper for the top, some 1/2″ tubing and a 1/2″ diameter bottling cane. Altogether, with tax, it was about $85.

After I got everything organized, cleaned, put together, and sanitized, things went pretty smoothly. I went with the 5 gallon Better Boy because I plan to generally use it for secondary fermentations and, at that point, usually I’m down in that range. When I racked the wine, I got a nice, full 5 gallons.

Blueberry-Muscadine Wine racked for some bulk conditioning.

Blueberry-Muscadine Wine racked for some bulk conditioning.

I then squeaked out about another quart, into a half gallon glass jug. I may go ahead and bottle that in a 22 oz bomber, when I get a chance. There’s too much head space there and I don’t want it to oxidize.

Once the wine was transferred and the glass carboy it was in was cleaned and sanitized, I prepared to rack the beer into it. I set-up the siphon and hose. Next, I added the grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer to the carboy and began racking the beer onto it.

Grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer.

Grapefruit zest and vodka from the freezer.

Once that was all squared away, I started making the hibiscus tea.

Unsweetened, dried hibiscus flowers.

Unsweetened, dried hibiscus flowers.

I used a quart of hot Culligan (bottled) water and 5 oz of dried hibiscus flowers to a 2 quart stainless steel sauce pan.

Steeping to a beautiful concentrate.

Steeping to a beautiful concentrate.

Since I didn’t have one a bit bigger, I went ahead and brought another quart of the water to a boil in a big stainless stock pot. After the hibiscus flowers were brought to a boil, I covered them and turned off the heat. The other water boiled for a few minutes and, after the flowers steeped for 10 minutes, I strained the tea concentrate into the boiling water. I cleaned the smaller pot and then strained the entire amount of liquid back into it and it just did manage to fill it completely. Note here…steeped hibiscus flowers don’t do well in a garbage disposal unit. I should have composted them. Live and learn. After a little disposer cleaning, I got back to my hibiscus concentrate and funneled it into a sanitized glass container, covered it with sanitized plastic wrap and stuck it in the refrigerator to cool overnight.

Bringing the temp down on the hibiscus tea concentrate.

Bringing the temp down on the hibiscus tea concentrate.

 

 

 

 

The final thing I wanted to accomplish tonight was to attempt to harvest some yeast. If I like the result in this gose, I wouldn’t mind making another gose or a maybe try making a kolsch, before the really cold weather starts coming around. So, for tonight, I poured off some of the trub that was left behind in the carboy that I racked out of and funneled it into a sanitized 1/2 gallon glass jug.

Attempting to harvest some yeast for future use.

Attempting to harvest some yeast for future use.

I topped that off with Culligan bottled water and added a sanitized cap. I’ll let that sit out overnight and separate. I’ll update here tomorrow when I add the hibiscus tea concentrate and further separate the yeast.

11/2/15 update: Added the hibiscus tea to the gose and it looks like a giant jar of cranberry sauce!

IMG_20151102_070230010

I also decanted the liquid off of the yeast I’m trying to harvest. My understanding is that the yeast is the thin whitish layer on the top of the sediment. I transferred that to a pint jar and added water, We’ll see how that settles.

Transferred yeast to smaller jar and added water.

Transferred yeast to smaller jar and added water.

Yeast settled for harvest.

Yeast settled for harvest.

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